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The magazine will feature exclusive interviews with artists, scientists, writers and creative thinkers.

Demystifying the psychedelic experience

Marta Kaczmarczyk is an expert in persuasive science and technology. She is interested in demystifying the psychedelic experience and creating a scientific framework that would be more accessible to the Western mind and more relevant than the shamanic or new age framework which is popular in the psychedelic community. She is a co-founder and a coordinator of Psychedelic Society of the Netherlands; a non-profit organization focused on advocating a safe use of psychedelic substances.

Becoming somebody else

Joshua Burraway is a medical anthropologist working at the intersection between social and political theory, cultural phenomenology, addiction medicine, and psychiatry. He is interested in how historical and structural forces shape different modes of subjectivity, in particular with regards to altered states of consciousness induced by psychoactive chemicals among homeless substance-users.

Philosophy and Psychedelics

Dr Peter Sjöstedt-H is an Anglo-Scandinavian philosopher of mind who specializes in the thought of Whitehead and Nietzsche, and in fields pertaining to panpsychism and altered states of sentience. In the words of futurist, philosopher and pop star Alexander Bard: ‘One of our favourite contemporary philosophers, Peter Sjöstedt-H…think a psychedelic Nietzsche’.

Art and Generative Systems

Gene Kogan is an artist, programmer and leading educator in the field of creative AI – who is developing the world’s first decentralized autonomous artist. He is a collaborator within numerous open-source software projects, and gives workshops and lectures on topics at the intersection of code and art.

On Computational Art

Ernest Edmonds’ art is in the constructivist tradition and he is a pioneer in the use of computers and computational ideas. His art explores algorithms used to relation to colour, time, communication and interaction. He first used computers in his practice in 1968, first showed an interactive artwork with Stroud Cornock in 1970 and first showed a generative time-based computer work in London in 1985. His many awards include ACM SIGGRAPH 2017; Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement In Digital Art and ACM SIGCHI 2017; Lifetime Achievement Award for the Practice of Computer Human Interaction.

On ‘The Artist in the Machine’

Professor Arthur I Miller is an authority on creativity, in both the arts and sciences. In his latest book, ‘The Artist in the Machine: The World of AI-Powered Creativity’, he introduces us to AI’s that are creating art, literature, and music that may well surpass the creations of humans. In this exclusive interview he discusses ideas and work that forms the subject of his book and celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

Voices

Aura Satz is Moving Image Tutor and Reader in Fine Art (Sound and Moving Image) on the Contemporary Art Practice programme at the Royal College of Art.

Aura Satz’s work encompasses film, sound, performance and sculpture. Her work centres on the trope of ventriloquism in order to conceptualise a distributed, expanded and shared notion of voice. Works are made in conversation and use dialogue as both method and subject matter.
Satz has made a body of work centred on various sound technologies in order to explore notation systems, code and encryption, and ways in which these might resist standardisation, generating new soundscapes, and in turn new forms of listening and attending to the other.

Cartoon Logic

Andy Holden is an artist who works in a variety of mediums.

His immersive new installation, ‘Laws of Motion in a Cartoon Landscape’, for the Science Gallery London exhibition ‘Dark Matter: 95% of the Universe is missing’ reflects on the physics of a cartoon environment which defy the normal conditions of gravity, force, and velocity.

On the Surface

Rachel Pimm works in sculpture, video and performance to explore environments and their materialities, histories and politics often from the point of view of non-human agents such as plants, minerals, worms, water, gravity or rubber. She is interested in the potential of surfaces and matter to transform.

Working in sound, Lori E Allen uses sources including obscure dialogue, background noise, cut-up word percussion and distorted popular television themes to create audio landscapes.

There’s more to this than meets the eye

The work of Yu-Chen Wang asks fundamental questions about human identity at a key point in history, where eco-systems and techno-systems have become inextricably intertwined. Yu-Chen’s central practice is drawing, allowing her to explore and meditate on mechanical and biological forms, and the ways in which their bodily borderlines blur and mutate. From these extemporisations, she then finds collaborative routes that take her work into the realms of fictional text, provoking the subsequent production of sculptural installation, performance, music, and film, in various combinations.

Her new large-scale intricate drawing, exhibited at the Science Gallery, London exhibition ‘Dark Matter: 95% of the Universe is missing’, explores the concepts of dark matter and how knowledge is created.