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The magazine will feature exclusive interviews with artists, scientists, writers and creative thinkers.

Drawn Forms

Massinissa Selmani’s work aims to create drawn forms mingling a documentary approach with fictional constructions and animations, while taking as its point of departure contemporary political and social issues from press cuttings. Through confrontation, juxtaposition and even the superposition of actual elements, whose contexts have systematically been concealed, the artist creates enigmatic, ambiguous scenes unlikely to happen in reality.

The human condition and the question of personal identity

Shelly Tregoning’s work is a response to the intimacies of her life – “an emotional connection to those closest to me and to fragments of the everyday that I encounter. I am trying to make sense in some way, of life and personal identity – through conversations with friends, places I have been and the things I see along the way. Visually gathering ‘moments’ which inform my work, these drawings and scribbles create a scaffolding upon which I build my images”.

Drawings hand-stitched

Wura-Natasha Ogunji is a visual artist and performer. Her works include drawings hand-stitched into tracing paper, videos and public performances. Her work is deeply inspired by the daily interactions and frequencies that occur in the city of Lagos, Nigeria, from the epic to the intimate. Ogunji’s performances explore the presence of women in public space; these often include investigations of labor, leisure, freedom and frivolity.

History, memory, masculinity and power balance

History, memory, masculinity and power balance are central themes in Marc Bauer’s work that consist for a major part of black and white drawings, but extends to animation film, ceramics, oil paint and sculpture. He describes drawing as “a way for me and the viewer, to comprehend reality in all its complexity – subjectively, politically, symbolically – and show how history, memory and shifting power structures shade the present.”

Transformations

Annie Cattrell’s practice is often informed by working with specialists in neuroscience, meteorology, engineering, psychiatry and the history of science. This cross-disciplinary approach has enabled her to learn about cutting edge research and in depth information in these fields. She is particularly interested in the parallels and connections that can be drawn within these approaches in both art and science.

On ‘The Dynamics of Transformation’

Grant Maxwell is the author of ‘The Dynamics of Transformation: Tracing an Emerging World View’, ‘How Does It Feel?: Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Bob Dylan, and the Philosophy of Rock and Roll’, and ‘Beyond Plato’s Cave’. He has served as a professor at Baruch College and Lehman College in New York, and he has written for the American Philosophical Association blog, American Songwriter magazine, and the Journal of Religion and Popular Culture.

Fragmenta and beyond

Micaela Lattanzio is a Roman photographer and artist who explores the fragmentation of female identity through the deconstruction and the subsequent reworking of female portraits. Her work explores the intricate paths of consciousness and self-awareness, the body and is a reflection on social relationships, on the specific weight that our presence has in our environment.

Transforming common materials

“My studio practice often fuses common household materials and ordinary life activities with semi-exotic art textures, supplies and procedures. I mix forms of art and life with emotional and ideological premises that culminate in artifacts that seem to find solace in concrete irreverence.”

Brett Reif is influenced by Arte Povera and specializes in non-traditional media wall work, sculpture and installation. His use of common household materials, surfaces and objects along with raw, natural objects to create drawings, paintings, reliefs, sculptures and installations, nurtures home materials to embody our stress, conflict, hope and fear.

Things Come Apart

Todd McLellan is a photographer and fixer from Canada. He was formally educated in photography at the Alberta University of the Arts but gained the bulk of his knowledge working in the field. He works both in the commercial photography/motion world as well as developing his personal work. His most recent photo series ‘Things Come Apart’ is a teardown of our everyday objects. The series is also currently touring North America with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) until 2021.

Exploring Complex Systems in Nature

“My work is an exploration of complex systems in nature, and the dynamic interplay of structure and contingency that makes up the universe. I begin with spirals as a basic unit of configuration. Using compressed air to create and move small currents of paint, I yield control to my materials so that these basic units become force fields, drawing energy within themselves like a vortex and radiating it outward. As they bump up against one another, and overlap, they create interference patterns and complex interstitial spaces. These vibrate in a dynamic interplay in which nothing is static, where “positive and “negative” spaces shift in relation to one another in the shifting light.”