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The magazine will feature exclusive interviews with artists, scientists, writers and creative thinkers.

Shadows in a Labyrinth

Canadian multidisciplinary artist Stéphanie Morissette’s works reflect on human behavior and the use of technologies in our quotidian life as well as in the geopolitical sphere; on conflicts and their psychological impact on the different participating actors.

In this exclusive interview she discusses her project, ‘Shadows in a Labyrinth’ (with co-collaborator Dale Einarson), which reflects on the complexity, the flaws and ephemeral aspects of our brain and memory, as well as on the medium and technologies, drawing parallels with mental illness and disease like Alzheimer.

Guiding Memory

Rosi Maria Di Meglio has recently completed a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts at Concordia University. Her artistic practice focuses on space and memory, on real life experiences and transformation. She considers herself a poetic abstract expressionist artist. Her philosophy is founded on the ideas that art has the power to move people whether they are observing or creating.

The Lines that Connect

Amanpreet Badhwar is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre de Recherche de l’Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal (CRIUGM), Université de Montréal , where she works on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias. Her research combines structural and functional imaging with clinical and genetic assessments to relate variations in brain connectivity to clinical status, and to develop early markers of AD pathology. She is also an artist. In this exclusive interview she discusses her relationship between art and neuroscience.

Design and Neuroscience

Alexa Piotte is a graphic designer living in Montreal. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts majoring in Design and minoring in behavioural neuroscience psychology from Concordia University. In this exclusive interview she discusses her work relating design and neuroscience, including her collaborative project, ‘BDL: Mapping out the Genetic Blueprint of the Fruit Fly Visual System’, with Hunter Shaw, a Ph.D. candidate in biology at McGill University.

Aesthetics and Memory

Anjan Chatterjee is a professor of neurology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He is director of the Penn Center for Neuroaesthetics and a member of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. His research focuses on spatial cognition and its relationship to language. He also conducts neuroaesthetics research and writes about the ethical use of neuroscience findings in society.

Neurocosmologies

Shanthi Chandrasekar is a multimedia and multidisciplinary artist with a BSc in Physics and an MA in Psychology. The underlying focus of her work is to understand the workings of the cosmos and life itself, with a particular fascination for the workings of the brain. She has also been trained in the traditional art form Tanjore Style painting. While many of her works are influenced by her Indian heritage, her true inspiration comes from the mystery and majesty of the world around her; her muse lives where the scientific overlaps with the spiritual.

Unseen Water

“My art practice involves an interplay between photography and scientific imaging, and is concentrated in the specific area of scientific photography made by the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), which has expanded the boundaries of observation and representation of the micro world. My work in the field of photomicrography aims to expand human visual vocabulary, revealing principles of beauty which are typically difficult to otherwise access”.

New media artist, Anastasia Tyurina, is an Associate Professor at the National Research University of Electronic Technology, Moscow and a sessional academic at Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, Brisbane. 

Visions of Science

“My main aim is to raise questions about how scientific developments – particularly relating to my current preoccupation with medical imaging – change the way people think about themselves, their bodies and their identity”.

Julie Light is a visual artist primarily creating sculptural objects in glass and other materials. Her current work is focused on the relationships between medical technologies and the self.

Dreamscapes

“The underlying focus of my work is to reverse engineer the psychology behind the human experience of special places. What I mean by ‘special places’ are precise locations in our world where something very powerful happens; namely, a reaction that goes beyond the visual to also encompass a visceral and cognitive response.”

Daniel Ambrosi has been exploring groundbreaking methods of visual presentation since graduating from Cornell University with degrees in architecture and 3D graphics. In 2011, he devised a unique form of computational photography that generates extremely high-resolution immersive vibrant images, His latest work, ‘Dreamscapes’, builds upon his previous experiments by adding a powerful new graphics tool, a modified version of ‘DeepDream’, a computer vision program evolved from Google engineers’ desire to visualize the inner workings of Deep Learning artificial intelligence models.