Tag Archives: Creativity

Laura Krasnow: the_space_between_the_stars

Laura Krasnow usies the medium of photography to explore the connections between the artistic and scientific realms of inquiry.

Working with traditional and non-traditional art making tools, including printmaking, digital photography, film and Polaroid film, drawing and paint, she seeks to interpret theories of physics, math and neurological research, to reconstruct individual recollections of time, place, and space.

Exploring Complex Systems in Nature

“My work is an exploration of complex systems in nature, and the dynamic interplay of structure and contingency that makes up the universe. I begin with spirals as a basic unit of configuration. Using compressed air to create and move small currents of paint, I yield control to my materials so that these basic units become force fields, drawing energy within themselves like a vortex and radiating it outward. As they bump up against one another, and overlap, they create interference patterns and complex interstitial spaces. These vibrate in a dynamic interplay in which nothing is static, where “positive and “negative” spaces shift in relation to one another in the shifting light.”

Interlocking Systems of Making

“My work is an exploration between vision and sound and the power of this connection to generate compelling visual environments. The inquiry of this integration has also satisfied a strong interest in the ideas and methodology of science as a basis for the conceptual underpinning of the work. As such, the method of creating my work is scientifically inspired with a well thought out and tested process oriented to have optimal pragmatic results both for the quality of the work itself and the benefits of the process for me as the maker.”

Daniel Hill is a painter, sound artist, curator, educator, and writer whose work explores the relationship between visual art, sound, and science. His paintings employ a rules based system in which the notion of embodied cognition is an inquiry as well as the balance between the aesthetic and conceptual.

Mindfully Dizzy

Harold Offeh is an artist working in a range of media including performance, video, photography, learning and social arts practice. Offeh, often employs humour as a means to confront the viewer with historical narratives and contemporary culture and is interested in the space created by the inhabiting or embodying of history.

To Not Follow Under

Leah Clements’s practice is concerned with the relationship between the psychological, emotional, and physical, often through personal accounts of unusual or hard-to-articulate experiences. Her work also focuses on sickness / cripness / disability in art, in critical and practical ways.

In March 2019, Leah launched ‘Access Docs for Artists’: an online resource made in collaboration with Lizzy Rose and Alice Hattrick to help disabled artists create and use access documents.

Ten Thousand Thoughts

Esther Rolinson is a British visual artist who explores the use of new media technology as well as long-established artistic languages such as drawing and sculpture. Her interest in bringing consciousness to our sensations led her to work with light. Due to its immediacy and potential to affect our senses, light became an important feature of her artistic production, one among a wide range of materials that she uses. Another key element is computer programming. In her work the use of new media is as essential as pencil and paper.

How a trippy 1980s video effect might help to explain consciousness

Robert Pepperell is an interdisciplinary researcher who works between art, science, and philosophy. He has published research in the fields of art history and theory, neuroscience, perceptual psychology, computer science, and philosophy of mind. He current leads FovoLab (www.fovography.com), where methods from art and science are combined to investigate the nature of visual experience and how it can be represented.

On ‘The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars’

When celebrated neuropsychologist Paul Broks’s wife died of cancer, it sparked a journey of grief and reflection that traced a lifelong attempt to understand how the brain gives rise to the soul. The result of that journey. ‘The Darker the Night, the Brighter the Stars’, is a gorgeous, evocative meditation on fate, death, consciousness, and what it means to be human.

In this correspondence Paul Broks discusses the production of this book with Garry Kennard, its illustrator.

How the power of art can help scientists like me understand the experience of schizophrenia

Associate professor and Royal Society Research Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford.

“My research aims to understand how individual genes impact on the complex brain functions that are altered in psychiatric disorders. I believe that understanding these links will help to explain why some people respond well to treatments, whilst others do not, and will ultimately lead to new and improved therapies.”

Superposition

Steve Sangapore is a contemporary oil painter based in Boston, MA. Using vastly different stylistic approaches with various series’, his work can be described as an amalgamation of realism, surrealism and abstraction with thematic focuses on the human condition.

“Displaying a disciplined technique and great attention to detail, the style of my work blurs the lines between contemporary realism, surrealism and pure abstraction – often in a single painting. Through these modes of technical execution, a deep exploration into aspects of the human condition resonate throughout the work by mode of scientific archetypes and philosophical elements.”