Tag Archives: Art

Brain Series

Michelle Hunter’s ‘Brain Series’ deconstructs familiar themes related to how our brains function and is meant to help the general public gain a greater appreciation for this organ we don’t usually “think” about. Using a painterly technique, the artist transforms everyday objects with a subtle unexpected surreal approach.

NeuroArt

Danial Arabali is an Iranian-German artist and Engineer. In one series of his ‘NeuroArt’ paintings, he takes a look at the neuronal networks from a more artistic point of view rather than realistic representations of existing structures, while in another series he attempts to apply the modern color theory concepts of expressionist German artists to visualize the beauty of neuronal connections in a more abstract manner.

The Beautiful Brain

Katharine Dowson’s inspiration comes from nature, medicine and the scientific world as she often collaborates with scientists as part of her artistic practice. These include researchers investigating genetics, dyslexia and Parkinson’s disease, producing intricate casts of her own heart and brain from MRI scans. Her sculptures are made in various media but especially transparent materials and glass, which she uses as a metaphor for a membrane, a fragile yet robust skin that allows light to pass through and reveal the hidden interior within.

The Pacemaker

Lidija Kononenko is a student from the Royal Academy of Arts in London, whose practice investigates methodologies of scientific research into the human condition. Her artwork ‘31-3594’ won the Art of Neuroscience 2020 in which she explores the nervous system in an interactive way. ‘The Pacemaker’ is an animation film exploring endurance training and emotional complexities in romantic relationships.

These artists paint with their feet – scans show how unique their brains are

Harriet Dempsey-Jones is a Postdoctoral Researcher in Cognitive Neurosciences, UCL. She is a researcher in the field of cognitive psychology at University College London, looking at how our brains and particular cognitive processes cause our subjective psychological and perceptual experience.

“My research looks at how the body processes touch and other sensory inputs. Particularly, I am interested in plasticity in the area of the brain that processes sensory inputs from your body – the somatosensory cortex. I look at how this system is shaped by adding or removing sensory inputs.”

Brain Terrains

Hanif Janmohamed is an artist based in Vancouver, Canada. His practice is focused on the Geographies of the Mind. ‘Brain Terrains’ is an ongoing body of work. A wandering, quixotic expedition through the common visual lexicons of our human and planetary bodies – a reframe of our inhabitation across scale through recombined medical and satellite imaging.

Brainscapes

Artist and writer, Richard Bright, has addressed the relationship between art, science and consciousness for over 30 years. He has exhibited both nationally and internationally and was the recipient of the ‘Visions of Science’ Award, The Edge, Andrew Brownsward Gallery, University of Bath (Second Prize Winner). In ‘Brainscapes’ he shows some works from his neuroscience inspired Limited Edition Prints.

Richard Paton: Exploring Magnetism as a Metaphor for Humanity’s Disconnect with Nature.

As one of the four fundamental forces in physics it has been harnessed to shape our modern world of electronics and how we interact with each other. For the last four years Fine Artist Richard Paton has explored various enigmatic aspects of magnetism and completed an MA in Art & Science at UAL in 2020. By researching Geomagnetism and Magneto Reception Paton’s artwork looks at how magnetism can be seen as a metaphor revealing a fundamental human disconnection with the earth itself and the animal’s which inhabit the natural world.
In recent pieces he tackles some of the most pressing issues of our times such as habitat degradation and species extinction which draw upon the evolution of the compass, mechanical automata and interactive electronics.

Jason deCaires Taylor’s Underwater BioCulture Sculpture at the Museo Atlantico, Lanzarote Island

A leading figure in art and ecology, John K. Grande is author of a range of books that include ‘Balance: Art and Nature’ and ‘Art Space Ecology’. In this article he discusses the work of sculptor and environmentalist, Jason deCaires Taylor, in particular his major project Museo Atlantico, a collection over 300 submerged sculptures and architectural forms in Lanzarote, Spain, the first of its kind in European waters. His pioneering public art projects are not only examples of successful marine conservation, but works of art that seek to encourage environmental awareness, instigate social change and lead us to appreciate the breathtaking natural beauty of the underwater world.