Archive | Articles RSS feed for this section

Exploring particular issue themes, articles will be created by contributors via invitation, commission and open submission from subscribers.

Visions of childhood

Penny Hay is an artist, educator and researcher. She is Director of Research for ‘5x5x5=creativity’, an arts research charity and is a part-time Senior Lecturer in Arts Education at Bath Spa University. Her doctoral research was focused on how adults can support children’s identity as artists.

Neva Delihas Setlow

“Color, light and science are my areas of artistic interest. My work explores both the abstract interactions of color and light as well as science in art. Whether I create a work of pure abstraction or one developed from a scientific concept, creating art holds an endless fascination for me. It is the excitement of discovering the unknown that I find moving.”

John Atkin: Access to Justice

The “Access to Justice” project has taken four years of careful negotiation and numerous visual concepts before The Law Society of Upper Canada eventually selected my landmark artwork for a prime location bridging Toronto’s Nathan Phillips Square and University Avenue, via the pedestrianised promenade of McMurtry Gardens of Justice.

The art and beauty of general relativity

“In general relativity, reason and imagination combine to synthesise a whole that neither alone could achieve.”

Margaret Wertheim is a writer, curator and artist whose work focuses on relations between science and the wider cultural landscape. A two-fold perspective animates her work: on the one hand science can be seen a set of conceptual enchantments that delight our minds and senses; on the other hand science is a socially embedded activity intersecting with philosophy, culture and politics.

The secret to creativity – according to science

“Creative imagination” is what we normally consider to be creativity with a large C – composing an opera or discovering something groundbreaking. This is different from everyday creativity, such as coming up with imaginative solutions to household problems or making crafts.

Creative inspiration is notoriously elusive. Being able to train creativity or induce a state of creativity has therefore long been the aim of many artists and scientists.

But is it possible?