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Exploring particular issue themes, articles will be created by contributors via invitation, commission and open submission from subscribers.

Ashkan Nejad Ebrahimi: Quintessence

“About 95% of our universe is invisible. It seems like ‘Everything’ is embraced by ‘Nothing’ and it makes me feel I am not alone and it causes a sense of relief involved with mystery.
Also as these dark things fill the distance between the visible matter, they fill a gap between science and art too; a distance which can be called wonder. an interruption which both of the Artist and the Scientist begin from there; Where we imagine about the state of a phenomenon.
what if we could see those things instead of regular ones…”

Can Aksoy: Chaosmos

Can Aksoy is an architect, art director, and visual artist. Through experimental photography and digital art, Aksoy is concerned with capturing the inner worlds/artefactual representations of the mind and eliciting the unconscious imagery.

Our study suggests the elusive ‘neutrino’ could make up a significant part of dark matter

Ian G McCarthy is a Reader in theoretical astrophysics at the Astrophysics Research Institute at Liverpool John Moores University in Liverpool, UK. He is a member of the ARI’s Computational & Theoretical Galaxy Formation group.

“I use both supercomputer simulations and good old-fashioned “pencil and paper” theory to study a variety of topics relating to structure formation in the Universe, including the formation and evolution of galaxies and the use of large-scale structure as a sensitive probe of cosmology. I work closely with observers to test the predictions of the simulations/models and to intepret the observational data.”

Bizarre ‘dark fluid’ with negative mass could dominate the universe – what my research suggests

Dr. Jamie Farnes is an astrophysicist and radio astronomer, currently based at Oxford University’s e-Research Centre (OeRC) in the UK. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2012 in the area of observational astrophysics. At Cambridge, he was based at Trinity Hall, the Cavendish Laboratory, and the Kavli Institute for Cosmology. He has also held postdoctoral positions at the University of Sydney, Australia, and as an Excellence Fellow at Radboud University, the Netherlands. His research has mostly focussed on driving forward the skills needed for next-generation Big Data radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) – which will be the largest radio telescope ever constructed.

Experiment picks up light from the first stars – and it may change our understanding of dark matter

Carole Mundell is Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy, Head of the Astrophysics Group, University of Bath. She is an observational astrophysicist who specialises in astrophysical phenomena outside of our own galaxy, including gamma ray bursts and active galactic nuclei. She leads the Bath Astrophysics Group and currently also acts as Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

We talk about artistic inspiration all the time – but scientific inspiration is a thing too

Tom McLeish is Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Department of Physics at the University of York specialising in soft matter, rheology and biological physics. He maintains a broad interdisciplinary research interests, and is a co-investigator in projects on medieval science, philosophy of emergence, social framing of science and technology, and theology of science. His book on the cultural position of science, “Faith and Wisdom in Science”, was published by OUP in 2014.