Archive | Articles RSS feed for this section

Exploring particular issue themes, articles will be created by contributors via invitation, commission and open submission from subscribers.

I go undercover into arms fairs – and secretly draw caricatures of the ‘hell’ I find there

Jill Gibbon is an artist and activist with research interests in drawing, and art as an interdisciplinary method. She currently uses performance and drawing to research the secretive world of the international arms trade. She has exhibited in the UK and US, and has drawings in the permanent collections of the Imperial War Museum, and the Peace Museum.

She has a B.A in Illustration from Leeds Polytechnic, an M.A in Visual Arts from Keele University, and a PhD from Wimbledon School of Art. She teaches Graphic Arts at Leeds Beckett University, specialising in drawing. She is an early career research fellow at the ISRF, and a founder member of Art Not Arms.

Through his art, a former prisoner diagnoses the systemic sickness of Florida’s penitentiaries

Nicole R. Fleetwood is Associate Professor of American Studies, Rutgers University. She is a cultural theorist and writer interested in visual culture, black cultural history, gender and feminist studies, performance, creative nonfiction, and poverty studies.

She is the author of two books: “Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness,” which was the recipient of the 2012 Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize of the American Studies Association, and “On Racial Icons: Blackness and the Public Imagination” (Rutgers University Press, 2015). Her articles appear in African American Review, American Quarterly, Aperture, Callaloo: Art and Culture in the African Diaspora, Public Culture, Signs, and Social Text.

She is completing her third book, “Marking Time: Prison Art and Public Culture,” a study of visual art in the era of mass incarceration.

David Haines and the Black Mirror/Facing faces

Images sourced from the internet often form the basis of David Haines’s work, whose practice actively examines the artist’s own position as someone who makes pictorial and textual narratives in the wake of abstraction, conceptual art and photography, and whose themes include an exploration of digital identities, online communities, contemporary myths and the indexical nature of drawing itself.

Drawing, the Body, and the Cognitive Unconscious

“My work begins with simple gesture drawings made with graphite. Executed without plan and with as few strokes as possible, the forms that emerge record a confluence of forces. A kind of collaboration between a sensing organism and the dynamics of its environment, each drawing is unique, irreproducible by definition.”

Taney Roniger is a visual artist, writer, and educator based in New York. Since the late 90s she has been exploring the relationship between art, science, and the spirituality of immanence in both her work as an artist and in numerous essays and symposia.

Cosmic alchemy: Colliding neutron stars show us how the universe creates gold

Duncan Brown is the Charles Brightman Professor of Physics at Syracuse University. He works on gravitational-wave astronomy and astrophysics.

Edo Berger is Professor of Astronomy at Harvard University. He researches a wide range of explosive and eruptive astrophysical phenomena, including gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events, super-luminous supernovae, and other optical transients (from the Pan-STARRS project and elsewhere), as well as magnetic activity in sub-stellar objects.

Mutatis Mutandis

Steven Connor is Professor of English at the University of Cambridge. Since 2018 he has been Director of CRASSH. His areas of interest include magical thinking; the history of medicine; the cultural life of objects and the material imagination; the relations between culture and science; the philosophy of animals; and the body, sense and sexuality. He has also written on contemporary art for Cabinet, Tate Etc, Modern Painters and others. His essay, ‘Mutantis Mutandis’, is on the work of Annie Cattrell.

UMWELT at BioBat Art Space

“Umwelt a three-artist exhibition at BioBAT Art Space…….Meredith Tromble, Patricia Olynyk, and Christine Davis are established artists who approach science as material for art. They have individually worked directly with scientists: as residents in their labs, as observers of scientific proceedings, as interviewers treating scientists as informants, and as direct co-creators of artworks. This collaborative presentation offers the opportunity to think about the different approaches that artists are taking to work with science in the new wave of art-science interactions and collaborations that is now well underway.”

Club Paradise

Cecelia Chapman is a Massachusetts based artist, born in San Francisco. Her work revolves around video, essay, storytelling, and works on paper and merges the documentary and experimental. Club Paradise: don’t be a tourist…vacation culture, capitalism, consciousness 2017-2019 examines vacation culture photographed and filmed on Cape Cod.

Climate crisis – here’s what the experts recommend we do

Hannah Hoag is Deputy Editor and Environment + Energy Editor, The Conversation. Hannah has covered the environment, science and medicine for more than 15 years. She has written for Nature, Science, Wired, bioGraphic, The Atlantic, the New York Times, the Globe and Mail and Maclean’s, among others. She launched and ran Arctic Deeply, an independent digital media project covering circumpolar Arctic issues. She has graduate degrees in biology (human genetics) from McGill University and in science and medical journalism from Boston University.

Jack Marley is Commissioning Editor, The Conversation. Jack joined The Conversation in 2018 after internships at Mongabay and The Press Association. He has a research background in marine biology and began his media career at university, where he reported on a fossil fuel divestment campaign for his campus paper. Jack covers science and environment and is interested in climate change, biodiversity and animal behaviour. He is based in Newcastle.

The digital revolution could unlock a green transformation of the global economy

Prof. Dr. Dirk Messner is the director of the Institute for Environment and Human Security of United Nations University (UNU-EHS). He is also the Co-Director of the “Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research” at the University of Duisburg-Essen. He is an internationally recognized expert on the topics of global change, digitalization, and sustainable development, transformation towards the decarbonization of the global economy, global governance and evolution of human cooperation.