Tag Archives: Nature

Marie Tharp pioneered mapping the bottom of the ocean 6 decades ago – scientists are still learning about Earth’s last frontier

Suzanne OConnell is Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University. She studies Antarctic paleoclimate using marine sediment cores from IODP (International Ocean Discovery Program). This is to understand how Antarctica has changed in the past, information that will help researchers to understand and model future climate change. Her current research focuses on Antarctic climate change using sediment cores from the Weddell Sea, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 113. She has authored or co-authored over 60 refereed publications and edited the JOIDES Journal as well as ODP Initial Reports and Scientific Results. In 2015, she co-edited and co-authored the book “Women in the Geoscience: Practical, Positive, Practices Toward Parity”

Arctic Ocean: why winter sea ice has stalled, and what it means for the rest of the world

Jonathan Bamber is Professor of Physical Geography, University of Bristol. His main areas of interest are in applications of satellite remote sensing data in the polar regions. More specifically, he has been working on the use of remote sensing data to study the behaviour of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic, Patagonia and to use these observations to test and/or improve climate and Earth System models. He is also using satellite and ground based data to investigate past and present variations in sea level.

The changing acoustic environment of the Arctic

Dr. Kate Stafford is a Principal Oceanographer at the Applied Physics Lab and affiliate Associate Professor in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington in Seattle. She has worked in marine habitats all over the world, from the tropics to the poles, and is fortunate enough to have seen (and recorded) blue whales in every ocean in which they occur. Stafford’s current research focuses on the changing acoustic environment of the Arctic and how changes from declining sea ice to increasing industrial human use may be influencing subarctic and Arctic marine mammals.

Seafloor currents sweep microplastics into deep-sea hotspots of ocean life

Ian Kane is Reader in Geology, University of Manchester. “I’m interested in how sediment, including mineral grains, organic fragments and anthropogenic material (such as microplastic), is moved across Earth’s surface and where it ends up. My main focus is on deep-marine environments which are the ultimate sinks for much of this sediment.”

Michael Clare is Principal Researcher in Marine Geoscience, National Oceanography Centre. His research interests include understanding how onshore sediment transport systems link to those in the deep sea, characterising seafloor geohazards, quantifying the rate and flux of deep sea particulate transport (including pollutants) over timescales from minutes to millions of years, assessing risks posed to globally important seafloor infrastructure, such as telecommunications cables and pipelines, by submarine geohazards, linking modern seafloor processes with ancient geological archives through integration of direct monitoring, repeat seafloor surveys, and sedimentary analysis and exploring novel tools to monitor seafloor hazards.

Lynne Goldsmith: Poems

Lynne Goldsmith’s first book, ‘Secondary Cicatrices’, won the 2018 Halcyon Poetry Prize, was a 2019 Finalist in the American Book Fest Awards, a 2020 Human Relations Indie Book Award Gold Winner and won a new Finalist Award in the International Book Awards. Her poetry has been published in Backchannels Journal, Spillway, Thimble Literary Magazine, Environmental Magazine, Red Planet Magazine, among others, with upcoming poems in Tiny Seed Literary Journal and Scotland’s 2020 Geopoetry Conference program. 

Biodiversity loss could be making us sick – here’s why

Jake M. Robinson is a PhD Researcher, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield. A professional ecologist and planetary health researcher with experience in both terrestrial and marine environments, his current research interests centres around three topics:
1. The environment-microbiome-health axis: investigating the relationship between microbes, the health of humans (noncommunicable and infectious diseases) and the wider environment
2. Remote sensing: using innovative technology to acquire and analyse remote data, particularly for biodiversity conservation and ecological restoration
3. Investigating nature-based solutions within planetary, one and eco-health frameworks

In Posse: Making female sperm

Charlotte Jarvis is an artist and lecturer working at the intersection of art and science. Her practice often utilises living cells and DNA: “I have recorded music onto DNA, seen my heart beat outside of my body and am currently making the world’s first female sperm. My work explores the body as a liminal space – a site for transformation, hybridisation and magic”. In Posse is a work In progress: “A mission to make ‘female’ sperm from my own stem cells”.

Humanity and nature are not separate – we must see them as one to fix the climate crisis

Heather Alberro is Associate Lecturer/PhD Candidate in Political Ecology, Nottingham Trent University.

“My work revolves around all things relating to the human-animal-nature relationship and its radical reconfiguration along harmonious/anti-anthropocentric lines. Specific disciplines of focus include radical environmental politics, environmental sociology, green utopian studies, environmental ethics, posthumanist studies, and sustainability.”