Tag Archives: Technology

The Alchemy of Oblique Topography

Ryota Matsumoto is a principal and founder of an award-winning interdisciplinary design office, Ryota Matsumoto Studio. He is an artist, designer and urban planner. His artwork reflects the morphological transformations of our ever-evolving urban and ecological milieus, which could be attributed to a multitude of spatio-temporal phenomena influenced by social, economic, and cultural factors.

Shadows in a Labyrinth

Canadian multidisciplinary artist Stéphanie Morissette’s works reflect on human behavior and the use of technologies in our quotidian life as well as in the geopolitical sphere; on conflicts and their psychological impact on the different participating actors.

In this exclusive interview she discusses her project, ‘Shadows in a Labyrinth’ (with co-collaborator Dale Einarson), which reflects on the complexity, the flaws and ephemeral aspects of our brain and memory, as well as on the medium and technologies, drawing parallels with mental illness and disease like Alzheimer.

Notes Toward a Theory of Sensorimotor Understanding

Dan Lloyd is the Thomas C. Brownell Professor of Philosophy and a Professor of Neuroscience at Trinity College, Connecticut. He is the author/editor of ‘Subjective Time: The philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality’ (co-edited with Valtteri Arstila). In this article he discusses his developing research into the animation and sonification of brain activity.

Neural Connections

Tyler Sloan is a freelance data artist/scientist. While he is not developing custom Jupyter-based data processing pipelines, he produces computer-generated artwork and data-driven motion design using Open Data and formal scientific models. His artwork combines elements of his training as a developmental neurobiologist (B.Sc, Ph.D.) with his passion for Open Data.

Dreamscapes

“The underlying focus of my work is to reverse engineer the psychology behind the human experience of special places. What I mean by ‘special places’ are precise locations in our world where something very powerful happens; namely, a reaction that goes beyond the visual to also encompass a visceral and cognitive response.”

Daniel Ambrosi has been exploring groundbreaking methods of visual presentation since graduating from Cornell University with degrees in architecture and 3D graphics. In 2011, he devised a unique form of computational photography that generates extremely high-resolution immersive vibrant images, His latest work, ‘Dreamscapes’, builds upon his previous experiments by adding a powerful new graphics tool, a modified version of ‘DeepDream’, a computer vision program evolved from Google engineers’ desire to visualize the inner workings of Deep Learning artificial intelligence models.

Who are we now or what will we be in various versions of the future?

“Our artworks investigate human futures and evolutionary paths influenced by emerging and disruptive technologies. So our work is not so much a prediction of the future or solution to issues of the day, but instead invites audiences into a space to explore the endless opportunities that can shift according to our desires and dreams.”

Based in London, Burton Nitta is an interdisciplinary art and design studio collaborating with science and technology to investigate our future world and human evolution.

Michael E Davias – LiDAR: Seeing the Earth in a New Light

When photography captures the Earth’s topography, vegetation often obfuscates the fine details. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) allows the solid surface to be viewed in a new light. I have applied LiDAR technology to research the “Carolina bays”, ovoid basins found by the tens of thousands in the USA.

Human bodies and the environment that they occupy

“I observe how human interactions happen and how the body moves through space, the motion and gestures associated with different activity. I also question why we move the way we do and how may we change those habits. In addition, I am extremely interested in how these natural interactions are effected by digital technology and artificial futures.”

Betty Zhang is an interaction designer and interdisciplinary artist creating sensory experiences that are immersive and interactive in both digital and non-digital media. Currently, she is exploring wearable technology, gestural interactions, biofeedback, and sound installations. Her work deals mainly with the body as a multi-functioning interface and performative medium.

Experiencing human-computer interaction

“I build interactive tools and design experiences that make human-computer interaction more tangible, divergent and meaningful. I work in this manner to investigate how computation could be unveiled and brought out into the real world, thus rendering it accessible to the diverse forms of distributed and embodied cognition that humans have always been using to live and act on this planet.”

Raul Altosaar is an infradisciplinary artist, technician and researcher. He leverages his foundational skills in computer graphics and extended realities to design spatial experiences and interactive tools.