Tag Archives: Nature

What’s the point of cities?

“If we each have responsibility for our own safety, we also have responsibility for our own adventure. Each time we swim in a city river, we re-imagine our city from the inside. Our skin is a permeable boundary, letting in the water and the city, feeling the soft impact of the seasons and the water.”

Amy Sharrocks is a live artist, sculptor and film-maker who invites people to come on journeys in which their own experience, communication and expression are a vital part. She has making work about people and water for 10 years.

Bodies of Water

“We are all bodies of water! What we do to water, we do to every body, including ourselves.”

Astrida Neimanis writes mostly about bodies, water and weather, in an intersectional feminist mode. Her most recent monograph is Bodies of Water: Posthuman Feminist Phenomenology. She is currently Senior Lecturer in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies and Key Researcher at the Sydney Environment Institute at the University of Sydney, on Gadigal land, in Australia.

Modified Perceptual Conditions and the Sublime

“A river is elusive: ever shifting, always moving, and in a constant state of flux. Is a river the water it contains or the channel through which it flows; or is it essentially a self-replicating memory? My work centers on the many facets of water: as a subject, a material, and an experience. I am looking for the ephemeral, sublime, and perceptually mysterious.”

David Teeple is a multidisciplinary artist using glass, water, and light to create formally simple yet perceptually complex works.

Interconnecting Water

Susan Derges has established an international reputation through her practice involving cameraless, lens-based, digital and reinvented photographic processes, encompassing subject matter informed by the physical and biological sciences as well as landscape and abstraction. Her art comprises an ongoing enquiry into the relationship of the self to the observed.

Perspectives on altering our perceptions of water

“The challenges we face with water are largely a consequence of how we perceive it in postmodern industrialized societies. Despite the myriad ways that water connects us to the world, our management and engineering of it seldom reflects that realization. Whereas expanding our perceptions of water may appear to be a relatively simple task, there are biological and behavioral factors that complicate our capacity and inclination to do so. Given the complex processes and systems that govern water in nature, our mimicking its patterns could supplement our comprehending or predicting them. ”

D.L. Marrin (nickname West) is an applied scientist specializing in biogeochemistry, water resources and aquatic ecology.

Reading the River

“The idea of interconnectedness has been one of the central themes of my water work for over forty years. Water issues are vast and present intricately complex problems. I think that the solutions and suggestions for actions lie in a diversity of approaches. It will take all of us working together cooperatively to come to the assistance of bodies of water around the globe. In this radically interconnected world it behooves each of us to compassionately take care of each other and our environment, because we are one and the same.”

In her pioneering inter-disciplinary practice, Basia Irland focusses on rivers and watersheds, water scarcity, climate change, ecological restoration and waterborne diseases. Her poetic, socially-engaged work endeavours to reconnect people with their local waterways in order to foster care, appreciation and responsibility.

The origin of water

John Finney is Emeritus Professor of Physics at University College, London. He is the author of ‘Water: A Very Short Introduction’, published by Oxford University Press. The book provides an introduction to the science of water, ice, snow, and steam, and how the structure of water molecules gives rise to its physical and chemical properties.

The Wonder Project

Curated by arts collective Shrinking Space, who have previously worked with the likes of Somerset House and the Science Gallery London, The Wonder Project will encompass specially commissioned soundscapes, sculptures and artworks from a roster of esteemed UK artists and creative studios. Audiences will meander through Wakehurst’s woods, meadows and glades to interact with installations embedded into the landscape. The Wonder Project will encourage people to step out of their comfort zones, step away from their go-to-responses to any given situation, and attempt to wonder about where they find themselves in a new light.

Trace Narratives over Vast Stretches of Time

Margaret Inga Urías is a multidisciplinary artist primarily using the medium of drawing to create engraved sculptures, site-specific installations, large-scale murals, constructed photographs and works on paper. Drawn to lost histories, concealed origins and imperceptible, forgotten connections, she is interested in conditions that entangle the past, the present, and the future–re-examining how we orient ourselves, not only in the immediacy of places around us, but also in the universe that maintains us. With a specific interest in the physical laws and circumstances that brought space, time, matter and beings into existence, she creates works that often function as trace narratives– following the story of the small, the coincidental, and the invisible, over vast stretches of time.

What is time – and why does it move forward?

“Einstein’s special theory of relativity, shows that time is … relative: the faster you move relative to me, the slower time will pass for you relative to my perception of time. So in our universe of expanding galaxies, spinning stars and swirling planets, experiences of time vary: everything’s past, present and future is relative.

So is there a universal time that we could all agree on?”

Thomas Kitching is a cosmologist, Reader in astrophysics, and Royal Society University Research Fellow working at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory at UCL. His interests are in dark energy, dark matter, statistics, and computer science. He is a manager in one of the worlds largest cosmology experiments, a European Space Agency mission called Euclid.