Archive of Author | Lucinda Burgess

Lucinda Burgess trained as a painter and then combined painting with teaching. She then became involved with oriental philosophy, and spent time in a monastic setting. Continuing a pattern of dramatic change, she went on to become a successful landscape designer, winning several awards at Chelsea and Hampton Court flower shows, including two golds, as well as an Association of Professional Landscapers award for her large-scale plant installation at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Since 2010 she has resumed her fine art practice, working primarily in three dimensions. Her background in oriental philosophy and landscape design has led to a fascination with the raw elemental qualities of materials and inform a sculptural practice that accentuates the reality of constant change, undermining the idea of a fixed thing, object, entity or identity.

Her art has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including among others, Nunnery Gallery (London), Municipal Gallery (Athens), The Tapestry (Liverpool), The Oxo Tower Wharf Gallery (London), Beaux Arts Gallery (London), The Truman Gallery (London), Jerwood Space (London), Mall Galleries (London), Royal West of England Academy (Bristol), Museum of Bath at Work (Bath), The Arndean Gallery (London). She won the Porthleven prize with a residency in 2014 and a commission for a large-scale sculpture in the harbour. She is currently part of The Jerwood Drawing Prize travelling exhibition.

She holds a BA in Fine Art, painting from Bath Academy of Art, a art teaching qualification from Goldsmiths, University of London and an MFA (with distinction) from Bath School of Art and Design.

www.lucindaburgess.com

Articles with Lucinda Burgess


Material repetition

“I am looking at materiality and repeatedly putting it through the same process, so repetition is a key aspect of my vocabulary. By repeatedly putting something through the same process – or by repeating something and putting it in a different context – it becomes all too apparent that things can’t be repeated, that each one is totally unique and never the same.”

Lucinda Burgess’s background in painting, landscape design and oriental philosophy has led to a fascination with the raw elemental qualities of materials and inform a sculptural practice that accentuates the reality of constant change, undermining the idea of a fixed thing, object, entity or identity.