Tag Archives: Creativity

Ecstasis

Fine artist Luciana Haill works with stroboscopic lighting & brainwaves (EEG signal) exploring consciousness & expressing the results through digital media, performance, sound & drawings.
Her artworks focus on liminal states of consciousness, sleep – more specifically the discrete states of Lucid Dreaming (the awareness within a dream & the ability to take control) & ‘Hypnagogia’ which is an inspirational state more commonly experienced at the onset of sleep & day-dreaming. She investigates the neural correlates & reveals these to the audience as changes in textured soundscapes & data visualisations. She is currently a visiting lecturer at Brighton University for the Digital Media Art MA.

From Computational Creativity to Creative AI and Back Again

Simon Colton is a British computer scientist, currently working as Professor of Computational Creativity in the Game AI Research Group at Queen Mary University of London, UK and in the Sensilab at Monash University, Australia. He previously had an appointment at Falmouth University, UK and led the Computational Creativity Research Groups at Goldsmiths, University of London and at Imperial College, London in the positions of Professor and Reader, respectively. Simon is the driving force behind thepaintingfool.com, an artificial intelligence that he hopes will one day be accepted as an artist in its own right.

In Praise of Form: Towards a New Post-Humanist Art

Taney Roniger is a visual artist and writer based in New York. Her awards and honors in the visual arts include three Yaddo fellowships, a grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, and a traveling fellowship from the Stacey Sussman Cavrell Memorial Foundation. Since 2012 she has been a contributing writer for The Brooklyn Rail, for which she served as Guest Editor in December 2017.

Neural Zoo

Sofia Crespo’s work consists of different projects working with artificial intelligence, computed image recognition, and neural networks. Her project, Neural Zoo, explores how creativity combines known elements in a specific way in order to create something entirely new. In the process of generating new creatures, that don’t exist yet, she offers a perspective on how similar human creativity works. The creator, in this case, would be the algorithm itself, but with a human artist as its muse.

Art and Generative Systems

Gene Kogan is an artist, programmer and leading educator in the field of creative AI – who is developing the world’s first decentralized autonomous artist. He is a collaborator within numerous open-source software projects, and gives workshops and lectures on topics at the intersection of code and art.

Meet AICAN, a machine that operates as an autonomous artist

Ahmed Elgammal is Professor at the Department of Computer Science, Rutgers University. Director of the Art & AI Lab. Executive Council Faculty at the Center for Cognitive Science at Rutgers University. His research focusses on Computer Vision, Visual Learning, Data Science in Digital Humanities, and Human motion analysis. His research on Art & AI received wide international media attention, including many reports on the Washington Post, New York Times, NBC News, the Times, the Daily Telegraph, Science News, and many others.

If machines want to make art, will humans understand it?

Rui Penha is assistant professor of composition at the Superior School of Music and Performing Arts in Porto. He is a composer and media artist, and his work has appeared in the National Contemporary Art Museum in Lisbon, among many others.

Miguel Carvalhais is an assistant professor at the University of Porto in Portugal. His latest book is ‘Artificial Aesthetics: Creative Practices in Computational Art and Design’ (2016).

On Computational Art

Ernest Edmonds’ art is in the constructivist tradition and he is a pioneer in the use of computers and computational ideas. His art explores algorithms used to relation to colour, time, communication and interaction. He first used computers in his practice in 1968, first showed an interactive artwork with Stroud Cornock in 1970 and first showed a generative time-based computer work in London in 1985. His many awards include ACM SIGGRAPH 2017; Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement In Digital Art and ACM SIGCHI 2017; Lifetime Achievement Award for the Practice of Computer Human Interaction.