Archive of Author | Danial Arabali

I am originally from Northern Iran – Gorgan. A beautiful green city which has everything that you expect nature to offer you: forest, mountains, sea and a few kilometers away dry land. Almost a decade ago I moved to Germany to pursue my Engineering studies however my deep interest in art, human studies and psychology of human behavior leaded me towards neuroscience. I believe, what makes life most exciting is the power of chance or accidents. In 2012 while I was a Masters student in Engineering and I was just walking around at the university campus in Bochum, I noticed a lecture about mechanisms of decision-making and I just participated in it. That was the gateway to enter the field of Neuroscience. One year after that I got a PhD position at the German primate center in Göttingen to study brain functions underlying eye and hand movement planning using various techniques. Meanwhile not only I never lost my subconscious deep interest in visual arts but I even worked more diligently on it. Somehow I felt I need to converge these two fields. Gradually I began to drop my ideas and perceptions of brain structures on the paper or canvas and that is how the series of “NeuroArt” emerged. Since 2015 I am working on this theme continuously and already exhibited these artworks in Germany and India. I also participated in the “Art of Neuroscience” competition organized by the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience. Moreover, I was granted to publish a selection of these works monthly as the cover image in the Springer journal “Der Nervenarzt”; Neurologie and Psychiatrie issues in 2019.

https://www.danialarabali.com/

Articles with Danial Arabali


NeuroArt

Danial Arabali is an Iranian-German artist and Engineer. In one series of his ‘NeuroArt’ paintings, he takes a look at the neuronal networks from a more artistic point of view rather than realistic representations of existing structures, while in another series he attempts to apply the modern color theory concepts of expressionist German artists to visualize the beauty of neuronal connections in a more abstract manner.