Tag Archives: Science

On Dark Matter and Dark Energy

Brian Clegg is an English science writer. He is the author of popular science books on topics including light, infinity, quantum entanglement and surviving the impact of climate change, and biographies of Roger Bacon and Eadweard Muybridge. In this exclusive interview he discusses ideas relating to his latest book, ‘Dark Matter & Dark Energy: The Hidden 95% of the Universe’.

Bizarre ‘dark fluid’ with negative mass could dominate the universe – what my research suggests

Dr. Jamie Farnes is an astrophysicist and radio astronomer, currently based at Oxford University’s e-Research Centre (OeRC) in the UK. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2012 in the area of observational astrophysics. At Cambridge, he was based at Trinity Hall, the Cavendish Laboratory, and the Kavli Institute for Cosmology. He has also held postdoctoral positions at the University of Sydney, Australia, and as an Excellence Fellow at Radboud University, the Netherlands. His research has mostly focussed on driving forward the skills needed for next-generation Big Data radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) – which will be the largest radio telescope ever constructed.

Experiment picks up light from the first stars – and it may change our understanding of dark matter

Carole Mundell is Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy, Head of the Astrophysics Group, University of Bath. She is an observational astrophysicist who specialises in astrophysical phenomena outside of our own galaxy, including gamma ray bursts and active galactic nuclei. She leads the Bath Astrophysics Group and currently also acts as Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

We talk about artistic inspiration all the time – but scientific inspiration is a thing too

Tom McLeish is Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Department of Physics at the University of York specialising in soft matter, rheology and biological physics. He maintains a broad interdisciplinary research interests, and is a co-investigator in projects on medieval science, philosophy of emergence, social framing of science and technology, and theology of science. His book on the cultural position of science, “Faith and Wisdom in Science”, was published by OUP in 2014.

Teleological behaviourism or what it means to imagine a lion

Howard Rachlin is an American psychologist and the founder of teleological behaviorism. He is Emeritus Research Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. His current research focuses on patterns of choice over time and how those patterns affect self-control (on which he worked with George Ainslie), including cooperation over time. His most recent book is The Escape of the Mind (2014).

Cassini’s Dreams

Sounds of the cosmos have only been explored to a limited degree yet Saturn’s rings have not been deeply explored for its sound. From Cassini’s research, artist China Blue and her team translated the raw data from the dust and ice particles combined with an artistic interpretation of what would be heard from Cassini’s viewpoint as it traveled through and around Saturn’s rings, to create the bases of her exhibition at the Venice Biennale 2019.

The ‘real you’ is a myth – we constantly create false memories to achieve the identity we want

Giuliana Mazzoni is Professor of Psychology, University of Hull. Human memory represents her main research interest, and more specifically the study on how personal memories are remembered in normal people and in those whose ability to remember is exceptional. Her work on memory has been featured in newspapers and magazines in the UK (among many, The Sunday Times) and around the world (among many,The Washington Post).

Contained

Inspired by an aesthetic in which art, science, medicine and ecology intersect, Elaine Whittaker’s art practice considers biology as contemporary art practice. Based principally in installation, sculpture, painting, drawing and digital imagery, her artworks incorporate a range of materials: from the traditional, such as paint, pigment and wax, to the unconventional, such as mosquitoes, salt crystals, cells and live microorganisms. They have been exhibited nationally and internationally, in art and science galleries, and featured in literary, medical and art magazines, including William Myers’ book, Bio Art: Altered Realities (2015). In this article she reflects on Contained, her 2018 exhibition, and the effects of illness on identity as experienced by her mother when she contracted Tuberculosis at an early age.