Tag Archives: Drawing

Projecting desires and fears

Anna Sofie Jespersen is a Danish artist based in London who produces emotive figurative works. Anna’s powerful drawings are laden with feeling. Her large scale works have a particularly strong impact. She trained at the Chelsea College of Art and has won awards for both drawing and painting, including second prize in the 2016 Jerwood Drawing Prize for her work ‘Sid in Bathtub’. She was shortlisted for the 2017 Bloomberg New Contemporaries.

Ritual forms and transformations

Kate Southworth makes paintings, drawings, prints and rituals as a way of understanding the transformative energies and unseen patterns of the psyche. Her work experiments with a ‘scattered form’ in which several visible and invisible fragments co-exist. Recent work maps her journeys into the unconscious mind revealing geometric and net-like forms. She has a particular interested in how processes of transformation emerge in the symbolic sphere: the hexagrams of the i-ching, alchemy, yoga traditions, calendric practices, and myths.

CIRCLINGS

CIRCLINGS shows examples of a new book of drawings by Garry Kennard, which were prompted by the final lines of the last canto of Dante’s Divine Comedy. These words describe the vision that Dante experiences at end of his journey through hell, purgatory and paradise. They tell of his witnessing the creative power at the heart of creation. In this he sees a great circling of reflected spheres and rainbows and, somehow, the human image within it all. The article includes the preface by Paul Broks, clinical neuropsychologist-turned-writer.

Vessels

Artist and writer, Richard Bright, has addressed the relationship between art, science and consciousness for over 30 years. He has exhibited both nationally and internationally and was the recipient of the ‘Visions of Science’ Award, The Edge, Andrew Brownsward Gallery, University of Bath (Second Prize Winner). In ‘Vessels’ he shows some recent work from the series.

I go undercover into arms fairs – and secretly draw caricatures of the ‘hell’ I find there

Jill Gibbon is an artist and activist with research interests in drawing, and art as an interdisciplinary method. She currently uses performance and drawing to research the secretive world of the international arms trade. She has exhibited in the UK and US, and has drawings in the permanent collections of the Imperial War Museum, and the Peace Museum.

She has a B.A in Illustration from Leeds Polytechnic, an M.A in Visual Arts from Keele University, and a PhD from Wimbledon School of Art. She teaches Graphic Arts at Leeds Beckett University, specialising in drawing. She is an early career research fellow at the ISRF, and a founder member of Art Not Arms.

Through his art, a former prisoner diagnoses the systemic sickness of Florida’s penitentiaries

Nicole R. Fleetwood is Associate Professor of American Studies, Rutgers University. She is a cultural theorist and writer interested in visual culture, black cultural history, gender and feminist studies, performance, creative nonfiction, and poverty studies.

She is the author of two books: “Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness,” which was the recipient of the 2012 Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize of the American Studies Association, and “On Racial Icons: Blackness and the Public Imagination” (Rutgers University Press, 2015). Her articles appear in African American Review, American Quarterly, Aperture, Callaloo: Art and Culture in the African Diaspora, Public Culture, Signs, and Social Text.

She is completing her third book, “Marking Time: Prison Art and Public Culture,” a study of visual art in the era of mass incarceration.

Drawn Forms

Massinissa Selmani’s work aims to create drawn forms mingling a documentary approach with fictional constructions and animations, while taking as its point of departure contemporary political and social issues from press cuttings. Through confrontation, juxtaposition and even the superposition of actual elements, whose contexts have systematically been concealed, the artist creates enigmatic, ambiguous scenes unlikely to happen in reality.

David Haines and the Black Mirror/Facing faces

Images sourced from the internet often form the basis of David Haines’s work, whose practice actively examines the artist’s own position as someone who makes pictorial and textual narratives in the wake of abstraction, conceptual art and photography, and whose themes include an exploration of digital identities, online communities, contemporary myths and the indexical nature of drawing itself.

The human condition and the question of personal identity

Shelly Tregoning’s work is a response to the intimacies of her life – “an emotional connection to those closest to me and to fragments of the everyday that I encounter. I am trying to make sense in some way, of life and personal identity – through conversations with friends, places I have been and the things I see along the way. Visually gathering ‘moments’ which inform my work, these drawings and scribbles create a scaffolding upon which I build my images”.