Tag Archives: Brain

Pattern Finding and the Thirty-Seventh Move

“People have always searched for the “song beneath the song” – a way to discover, match, and predict the patterns of a complicated world. Every job, from firefighting to lawyering, demands that practitioners learn the patterns, say, of how a fire grows or an argument is made. But how deep do patterns go? Are there patterns that underlie it all? Can our computers learn them for us?”

Embedded beings: how we blended our minds with our devices

Saskia K Nagel is assistant professor in philosophy and ethics of technology at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. She is interested in the intersection of ethics, philosophy and life sciences, and how technologies influence our self-understanding.

Peter Reiner is professor and co-founder of the National Core for Neuroethics at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, where he is a member of the Department of Psychiatry and the Centre for Brain Health. He is interested in quantitative analysis of public attitudes towards diverse issues in neuroethics, the contours of autonomy in the real world, and the neuroethical implications of Technologies of the Extended Mind

Megan McGlynn

“My work is inspired equally by architecture and neuroscience. Through a layering of geometric networks, my work provides a glimpse into the complexity and functionality of neural processes. It explores human perception from the inside and out: how we take in and recollect visual information through the anatomy of our brains, and the unruly imagery it creates in the mind’s eye.”