Tag Archives: Sculpture

Mutatis Mutandis

Steven Connor is Professor of English at the University of Cambridge. Since 2018 he has been Director of CRASSH. His areas of interest include magical thinking; the history of medicine; the cultural life of objects and the material imagination; the relations between culture and science; the philosophy of animals; and the body, sense and sexuality. He has also written on contemporary art for Cabinet, Tate Etc, Modern Painters and others. His essay, ‘Mutantis Mutandis’, is on the work of Annie Cattrell.

Transformations

Annie Cattrell’s practice is often informed by working with specialists in neuroscience, meteorology, engineering, psychiatry and the history of science. This cross-disciplinary approach has enabled her to learn about cutting edge research and in depth information in these fields. She is particularly interested in the parallels and connections that can be drawn within these approaches in both art and science.

Club Paradise

Cecelia Chapman is a Massachusetts based artist, born in San Francisco. Her work revolves around video, essay, storytelling, and works on paper and merges the documentary and experimental. Club Paradise: don’t be a tourist…vacation culture, capitalism, consciousness 2017-2019 examines vacation culture photographed and filmed on Cape Cod.

Fragmenta and beyond

Micaela Lattanzio is a Roman photographer and artist who explores the fragmentation of female identity through the deconstruction and the subsequent reworking of female portraits. Her work explores the intricate paths of consciousness and self-awareness, the body and is a reflection on social relationships, on the specific weight that our presence has in our environment.

Transforming common materials

“My studio practice often fuses common household materials and ordinary life activities with semi-exotic art textures, supplies and procedures. I mix forms of art and life with emotional and ideological premises that culminate in artifacts that seem to find solace in concrete irreverence.”

Brett Reif is influenced by Arte Povera and specializes in non-traditional media wall work, sculpture and installation. His use of common household materials, surfaces and objects along with raw, natural objects to create drawings, paintings, reliefs, sculptures and installations, nurtures home materials to embody our stress, conflict, hope and fear.

Things Come Apart

Todd McLellan is a photographer and fixer from Canada. He was formally educated in photography at the Alberta University of the Arts but gained the bulk of his knowledge working in the field. He works both in the commercial photography/motion world as well as developing his personal work. His most recent photo series ‘Things Come Apart’ is a teardown of our everyday objects. The series is also currently touring North America with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) until 2021.

Consider Falling

Sarah Howe is a UK based artist whose installations situate still and moving image within sculptural space. Her work stands in the crossing between a material and psychological landscape, in a reach to illustrate heightened inner states.

Her installation ‘Consider Falling’ is rooted in research into derealisation (the condition of feeling that reality is unreal) and depersonalisation (a feeling of detachment from oneself, or that oneself is unreal) collectively referred to as DPD.

Ten Thousand Thoughts

Esther Rolinson is a British visual artist who explores the use of new media technology as well as long-established artistic languages such as drawing and sculpture. Her interest in bringing consciousness to our sensations led her to work with light. Due to its immediacy and potential to affect our senses, light became an important feature of her artistic production, one among a wide range of materials that she uses. Another key element is computer programming. In her work the use of new media is as essential as pencil and paper.

On the Surface

Rachel Pimm works in sculpture, video and performance to explore environments and their materialities, histories and politics often from the point of view of non-human agents such as plants, minerals, worms, water, gravity or rubber. She is interested in the potential of surfaces and matter to transform.

Working in sound, Lori E Allen uses sources including obscure dialogue, background noise, cut-up word percussion and distorted popular television themes to create audio landscapes.