Tag Archives: Sculpture

The Camille Diaries: New Artistic Positions on M/otherhood, Life and Care

The exhibition and the symposium ‘The Camille Diaries: New Artistic Positions on M/Otherhood, Life and Care’ (at ArtLaboratoryBerlin) presents new artistic works by eleven international artists:- Sonia Levy, Mary Maggic, Naja Ryde Ankarfeldt, Baum & Leahy, Špela Petric, Margherita Pevere, Ai Hasegawa, Nicole Clouston, Cecilia Jonsson and Tarah Rhoda. Under the current conditions of our world (the environmental crises, gender aspects, biopolitics, etc.), the artists reflect the term “motherhood” in a greatly expanded form, namely as a ‘taking care of’, as an interpersonal relationship.

Ancient Ritual in Contemporary Mark-Making

“The power of the natural world, its intrinsic energy and fundamental properties, is dependent upon a fine balance. The balance of positive and negative forces resides from the smallest particles that make up our universe to concepts we live with every day: night/day and dark/light; finite/infinite and one/zero; quiet/loud and soft/hard; organic/manmade and the natural environment as opposed to the constructed cities. My work has been centered on concepts of this balance of opposites, as well as methods of numerical systems and patterning we use to construct an order to our world.”

Catherine Eaton Skinner’s works incorporate painting and encaustic, sculpture, printmaking, and photography. The figure, both human and animal, is an important element in her work and acts as a source of inspiration and exploration of identity, spirit and the paradoxes of human existence. She discusses her life and work in ‘Ancient Ritual in Contemporary Mark-Making’.

Invented Biology

“I dye, paint and stitch silk and wool to create boldly colored biomorphic wallhangings inspired by microscopic/cellular imagery – a kind of visual invented biology with textiles.”

Fiber artist, Karen Kamenetzky, creates a kind of ‘invented biology’, inspired by microscopic and cellular imagery, with works zooming in on that fundamental nature of things and bringing it into vision. She works loosely from sketches but each piece travels a route of evolution and change.

Cellular Papercuts

“All the sculptures I make are either hand or laser cut from layers of paper and then hand mounted to create three dimensional structures……..It is also a material perfectly adapted to describe the complexity of the natural world as it embodies the paradoxical qualities that we find in nature: its fragility and durability, its strength and delicacy.”

Inspired by the narratives of scientific discovery and innovation that increasingly dominate contemporary culture, Rogan Brown’s work is an attempt by a non-scientist, an outsider, to visualize, comprehend and assimilate these new ideas and new ways of seeing the world, whether it’s to do with our changing perception of bacteria or the paradigm shifts in our comprehension of the physical world that emerge from quantum physics.

Exploring the microscopic

Artist Klari Reis is best known for her Petri Dish series, a multicolour set of circular blobs created using a blend of media and ground-breaking techniques. The core of her approach is the transformation and pigmentation of a UV-resistant plastic, the epoxy polymer, into unique and cutting edge artworks. She uses the tools and techniques of science in her creative process, constantly experimenting with new ways to apply materials and methods. She is driven by curiosity and her desire to explore and document the natural and unnatural with a sense of wonder and joy.

Growth, change and renewal

Andrew McKeown has completed many large scale sculpture commissions throughout the U.K and internationally. Recurring themes within his work are those of growth, change and renewal and these natural or organic themes are often combined with site specific historical or industrial references which can be both literal and metaphorical. Andrew’s expertise is in sculpture, design and environmental regeneration. Casting and mould making processes inform and influence his work in both a practical and conceptual way and he often create installations of multiple sculptures which are cast or fabricated in durable materials such as iron, steel, bronze and stone.

Mutatis Mutandis

Steven Connor is Professor of English at the University of Cambridge. Since 2018 he has been Director of CRASSH. His areas of interest include magical thinking; the history of medicine; the cultural life of objects and the material imagination; the relations between culture and science; the philosophy of animals; and the body, sense and sexuality. He has also written on contemporary art for Cabinet, Tate Etc, Modern Painters and others. His essay, ‘Mutantis Mutandis’, is on the work of Annie Cattrell.

Transformations

Annie Cattrell’s practice is often informed by working with specialists in neuroscience, meteorology, engineering, psychiatry and the history of science. This cross-disciplinary approach has enabled her to learn about cutting edge research and in depth information in these fields. She is particularly interested in the parallels and connections that can be drawn within these approaches in both art and science.

Club Paradise

Cecelia Chapman is a Massachusetts based artist, born in San Francisco. Her work revolves around video, essay, storytelling, and works on paper and merges the documentary and experimental. Club Paradise: don’t be a tourist…vacation culture, capitalism, consciousness 2017-2019 examines vacation culture photographed and filmed on Cape Cod.

Fragmenta and beyond

Micaela Lattanzio is a Roman photographer and artist who explores the fragmentation of female identity through the deconstruction and the subsequent reworking of female portraits. Her work explores the intricate paths of consciousness and self-awareness, the body and is a reflection on social relationships, on the specific weight that our presence has in our environment.