Archive of Author | Kevin Warwick

Kevin Warwick is Emeritus Professor at Reading and Coventry Universities. Prior to that he was Deputy Vice Chancellor (Research) at Coventry University, England. His main research areas are artificial intelligence, biomedical systems, robotics and cyborgs. Due to his research as a self-experimenter he is frequently referred to as the world’s first Cyborg. Kevin was born in Coventry, UK and left school to join British Telecom.  He took his first degree at Aston University, followed by a PhD and research post at Imperial College London.  He held positions at Oxford, Newcastle, Warwick and Reading Universities before joining Coventry.

Kevin is a Chartered Engineer who has published over 600 research papers. His experiments into implant technology led to him being featured as the cover story on the US magazine, ‘Wired’. He achieved the world’s first direct electronic communication between two human nervous systems, the basis for thought communication. Another project extended human sensory input to include ultrasonics. He also linked his nervous system with the internet in order to control a robot hand directly from his neural signals, across the Atlantic Ocean.

He has been awarded higher doctorates (DSc) by Imperial College and the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague. He has also been awarded 9 Honorary Doctorates. He received The IEE Senior Achievement Medal, the IET Mountbatten Medal and the Ellison-Cliffe Medal from the Royal Society of Medicine.  In 2000 Kevin presented the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures and in 2017 he presented the Paul B. Baltes Lecture at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities.

www.kevinwarwick.com

Articles with Kevin Warwick


Cyborgs and I

Professor Kevin Warwick’s main research areas are artificial intelligence, biomedical systems, robotics and cyborgs. Due to his research as a self-experimenter he is frequently referred to as the world’s first Cyborg. His experiments into implant technology led to him being featured as the cover story on the US magazine, ‘Wired’. He achieved the world’s first direct electronic communication between two human nervous systems, the basis for thought communication. Another project extended human sensory input to include ultrasonics. He also linked his nervous system with the internet in order to control a robot hand directly from his neural signals, across the Atlantic Ocean. In this exclusive interview he discusses his ideas and work on AI, robotics and the future of humans ‘plugging’ into technology.