Tag Archives: Environment

The medieval senses were transmitters as much as receivers

Chris Woolgar is Professor of History and Archival Studies at the University of Southampton.

“I have a long-standing interest in the history of the everyday, especially in the medieval period, in patterns of documentation and in editorial work. Publications on medieval social and economic history include two volumes of household accounts edited for the British Academy’s Records of Social and Economic History series, an edition of the testamentary records of the bishops of England and Wales for the Canterbury and York Society, and three books with Yale University Press: The Great Household in Late Medieval England, The Senses in Late Medieval England, and The Culture of Food in England, 1200‒1500.”

Plants can tell time even without a brain – here’s how

Mark Greenwood is a PhD researcher in cellular biology at Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge. He is interested in how cells work together to create useful systems. In his PhD in James Locke’s group, he is using a mixture of experiments and theory to understand how cells interact to keep track of the time of day. They found that the circadian clock in individual cells of Arabidopsis thaliana can use local cell-to-cell signalling to agree on the time. He now hopes to further this work towards an understanding that may inform growth strategies in the field.

James Locke is Research Group Leader in Systems Biology, University of Cambridge. During his PhD James used an iterative process of experiment and theory to propose a new feedback loop in the plant circadian (24-hour) clock. For this work he was awarded the Promega Young Geneticist of the Year award (2007). Since 2012 he has been a group leader at the Sainsbury laboratory investigating gene expression dynamics in microbial and plant systems. He was awarded the Merrimack-CSB2 Prize in Systems Biology in 2013.

Transformations

Annie Cattrell’s practice is often informed by working with specialists in neuroscience, meteorology, engineering, psychiatry and the history of science. This cross-disciplinary approach has enabled her to learn about cutting edge research and in depth information in these fields. She is particularly interested in the parallels and connections that can be drawn within these approaches in both art and science.

Club Paradise

Cecelia Chapman is a Massachusetts based artist, born in San Francisco. Her work revolves around video, essay, storytelling, and works on paper and merges the documentary and experimental. Club Paradise: don’t be a tourist…vacation culture, capitalism, consciousness 2017-2019 examines vacation culture photographed and filmed on Cape Cod.

Climate crisis – here’s what the experts recommend we do

Hannah Hoag is Deputy Editor and Environment + Energy Editor, The Conversation. Hannah has covered the environment, science and medicine for more than 15 years. She has written for Nature, Science, Wired, bioGraphic, The Atlantic, the New York Times, the Globe and Mail and Maclean’s, among others. She launched and ran Arctic Deeply, an independent digital media project covering circumpolar Arctic issues. She has graduate degrees in biology (human genetics) from McGill University and in science and medical journalism from Boston University.

Jack Marley is Commissioning Editor, The Conversation. Jack joined The Conversation in 2018 after internships at Mongabay and The Press Association. He has a research background in marine biology and began his media career at university, where he reported on a fossil fuel divestment campaign for his campus paper. Jack covers science and environment and is interested in climate change, biodiversity and animal behaviour. He is based in Newcastle.

The digital revolution could unlock a green transformation of the global economy

Prof. Dr. Dirk Messner is the director of the Institute for Environment and Human Security of United Nations University (UNU-EHS). He is also the Co-Director of the “Käte Hamburger Kolleg / Centre for Global Cooperation Research” at the University of Duisburg-Essen. He is an internationally recognized expert on the topics of global change, digitalization, and sustainable development, transformation towards the decarbonization of the global economy, global governance and evolution of human cooperation.

Listening to nature: How sound can help us understand environmental change

Garth Paine is a composer, scholar and acoustic ecologist. He is an associate professor in interactive sound and digital media in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and associate professor of composition in the School of Music at Arizona State University. He crosses art-science boundaries with his community embedded work on environmental listening and creative place-making in addition to his environmental musical works and performances. In 2018 he was researcher/artist in residence in Europe at IRCAM (Centre Pompideau) and Center for Arts and Media (ZKM).