Tag Archives: Environment

Biodiversity loss could be making us sick – here’s why

Jake M. Robinson is a PhD Researcher, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield. A professional ecologist and planetary health researcher with experience in both terrestrial and marine environments, his current research interests centres around three topics:
1. The environment-microbiome-health axis: investigating the relationship between microbes, the health of humans (noncommunicable and infectious diseases) and the wider environment
2. Remote sensing: using innovative technology to acquire and analyse remote data, particularly for biodiversity conservation and ecological restoration
3. Investigating nature-based solutions within planetary, one and eco-health frameworks

Humanity and nature are not separate – we must see them as one to fix the climate crisis

Heather Alberro is Associate Lecturer/PhD Candidate in Political Ecology, Nottingham Trent University.

“My work revolves around all things relating to the human-animal-nature relationship and its radical reconfiguration along harmonious/anti-anthropocentric lines. Specific disciplines of focus include radical environmental politics, environmental sociology, green utopian studies, environmental ethics, posthumanist studies, and sustainability.”

It’s not easy to make landscape a place: you have to feel it

Fiona Stafford is Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Oxford and tutorial fellow at Somerville College. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She works on literature of the Romantic period, especially Austen, Burns, Clare, Keats, Wordsworth and Coleridge, and on their literary influences on modern poetry. Her research interests also include late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century culture; Irish and Scottish literature (post 1700); Archipelagic literature and art; Place and Nature Writing (old and new); Trees, Flowers and their cultural history; Environmental Humanities; literature and the visual arts.

Her most recent book is ‘The Brief Life of Flowers’ (2018). Like her acclaimed book, ‘The Long, Long Life of Trees’ (2016), it draws on first hand observation, literature, art, folklore, mythology, cultural history, natural science, botany, history of medicine.

Coronavirus has changed our sense of place, so together we must re-imagine our cities

Dr Tony Matthews is an award-winning Urban and Environmental Planner, with portfolios in academia, practice and the media. He is a faculty member at Griffith University, where he is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Environment & Science and the Cities Research Institute.

His research and practice interests include adapting cities to climate change impacts; the role and function of green infrastructure; sustainable and low carbon design; the interplay between built environments and human health; and achieving high quality urban design outcomes. He is also an active public writer and commentator with hundreds of national and international print, radio and television media appearances. He founded the Urban Broadcast Collective (@urbanpodcasts), a curated network of podcasts dedicated to cities and urban life. Tony also co-developed and co-presented ‘The Urban Squeeze’ radio program on ABC Radio, which ran for two seasons and won three Awards for Excellence from the Planning Institute of Australia.

The medieval senses were transmitters as much as receivers

Chris Woolgar is Professor of History and Archival Studies at the University of Southampton.

“I have a long-standing interest in the history of the everyday, especially in the medieval period, in patterns of documentation and in editorial work. Publications on medieval social and economic history include two volumes of household accounts edited for the British Academy’s Records of Social and Economic History series, an edition of the testamentary records of the bishops of England and Wales for the Canterbury and York Society, and three books with Yale University Press: The Great Household in Late Medieval England, The Senses in Late Medieval England, and The Culture of Food in England, 1200‒1500.”

Plants can tell time even without a brain – here’s how

Mark Greenwood is a PhD researcher in cellular biology at Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge. He is interested in how cells work together to create useful systems. In his PhD in James Locke’s group, he is using a mixture of experiments and theory to understand how cells interact to keep track of the time of day. They found that the circadian clock in individual cells of Arabidopsis thaliana can use local cell-to-cell signalling to agree on the time. He now hopes to further this work towards an understanding that may inform growth strategies in the field.

James Locke is Research Group Leader in Systems Biology, University of Cambridge. During his PhD James used an iterative process of experiment and theory to propose a new feedback loop in the plant circadian (24-hour) clock. For this work he was awarded the Promega Young Geneticist of the Year award (2007). Since 2012 he has been a group leader at the Sainsbury laboratory investigating gene expression dynamics in microbial and plant systems. He was awarded the Merrimack-CSB2 Prize in Systems Biology in 2013.

Transformations

Annie Cattrell’s practice is often informed by working with specialists in neuroscience, meteorology, engineering, psychiatry and the history of science. This cross-disciplinary approach has enabled her to learn about cutting edge research and in depth information in these fields. She is particularly interested in the parallels and connections that can be drawn within these approaches in both art and science.