Tag Archives: Ecocide

Arctic Ocean: why winter sea ice has stalled, and what it means for the rest of the world

Jonathan Bamber is Professor of Physical Geography, University of Bristol. His main areas of interest are in applications of satellite remote sensing data in the polar regions. More specifically, he has been working on the use of remote sensing data to study the behaviour of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic, Patagonia and to use these observations to test and/or improve climate and Earth System models. He is also using satellite and ground based data to investigate past and present variations in sea level.

The changing acoustic environment of the Arctic

Dr. Kate Stafford is a Principal Oceanographer at the Applied Physics Lab and affiliate Associate Professor in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington in Seattle. She has worked in marine habitats all over the world, from the tropics to the poles, and is fortunate enough to have seen (and recorded) blue whales in every ocean in which they occur. Stafford’s current research focuses on the changing acoustic environment of the Arctic and how changes from declining sea ice to increasing industrial human use may be influencing subarctic and Arctic marine mammals.

Seafloor currents sweep microplastics into deep-sea hotspots of ocean life

Ian Kane is Reader in Geology, University of Manchester. “I’m interested in how sediment, including mineral grains, organic fragments and anthropogenic material (such as microplastic), is moved across Earth’s surface and where it ends up. My main focus is on deep-marine environments which are the ultimate sinks for much of this sediment.”

Michael Clare is Principal Researcher in Marine Geoscience, National Oceanography Centre. His research interests include understanding how onshore sediment transport systems link to those in the deep sea, characterising seafloor geohazards, quantifying the rate and flux of deep sea particulate transport (including pollutants) over timescales from minutes to millions of years, assessing risks posed to globally important seafloor infrastructure, such as telecommunications cables and pipelines, by submarine geohazards, linking modern seafloor processes with ancient geological archives through integration of direct monitoring, repeat seafloor surveys, and sedimentary analysis and exploring novel tools to monitor seafloor hazards.

Earth video talks

Featuring – Zaria Forman: Drawings that show the beauty and fragility of Earth ; Al Gore: The Case for Optimism on Climate Change ; Satish Kumar: Soil, Soul and Society ; Sam ‘Ohu Gon III: Lessons from a thousand years of island sustainability ; Tega Brain: Eccentric Engineering: Thoughts for the Anthropocene ; and Francesco Sauro: Deep Under the Earth’s Surface, Discovering Beauty and Science.

Cape Farewell and the art of David Buckland

“We face our humanity and its effect on climate change with a cold stare crafting works that are as emotionally alarming as the hard facts of our scientists.”

Artist, film-maker, writer, curator, and founder and international director of the Cape Farewell project, David Buckland’s focus of enquiry is embedded in what we touch, intellectually and physically.

Curator of ‘eARTh’ for the Royal Academy 2009, U-n-f-o-l-d for Cape Farewell 2010, and Carbon 12 for Paris 2012, he had also produced the films ‘Art from the Arctic’ 2006 for the BBC and ‘Burning Ice’ for Sundance, 2010.

In 2001 he created and now directs the international Cape Farewell project – www.capefarewell.com. Bringing artists, visionaries, scientists and educators together, Cape Farewell continues to build an international collective awareness and the cultural response to climate disruption.

The Domestication of Plastic

Heather Davis is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at the Pennsylvania State University where she researches the ethology of plastic and its links to petrocapitalism. She is the co-editor (with Etienne Turpin) of ‘Art in the Anthropocene: Encounters Among Aesthetics, Politics, Environments and Epistemologies’ (Open Humanities Press, 2015) and ‘Desire Change: Contemporary Feminist Art in Canada’ (MAWA/McGill Queen’s UP, forthcoming 2017).

Earth Justice

Helen Moore’s award-winning poem records the mock ecocide trial held at London’s Supreme Court in 2011. The project was initiated by Polly Higgins, an environmental lawyer, barrister and author, as part of the Eradicating Ecocide campaign to make ecocide the fifth international Crime against Peace.