Tag Archives: Climate Change

David Fore: Poems

David Livingstone Fore is a researcher and designer living in Oakland, California. His most recent work explores relationships between climate changes taking place in the world and those taking place in our bodies.

Is humanity doomed because we can’t plan for the long term? Three experts discuss

Robin Dunbar is Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Experimental Psycology, University of Oxford. His research is concerned with trying to understand the behavioural, cognitive and neuroendocrinological mechanisms that underpin social bonding in primates (in general) and humans (in particular).

Chris Zebrowski is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, Loughborough University. His research analyses the concept of resilience in the context of the changing rationalities and practices of risk management and security.

Per Olsson is a Researcher, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University. He is a transdisciplinary researcher and has worked in the interface of natural and social sciences and humanities. His current research focuses on agency and system entrepreneurship, social-ecological innovations, transformations to sustainability, and how to reverse current trends of crossing critical thresholds and tipping points in the Earth system.

Humanity and nature are not separate – we must see them as one to fix the climate crisis

Heather Alberro is Associate Lecturer/PhD Candidate in Political Ecology, Nottingham Trent University.

“My work revolves around all things relating to the human-animal-nature relationship and its radical reconfiguration along harmonious/anti-anthropocentric lines. Specific disciplines of focus include radical environmental politics, environmental sociology, green utopian studies, environmental ethics, posthumanist studies, and sustainability.”

Climate crisis – here’s what the experts recommend we do

Hannah Hoag is Deputy Editor and Environment + Energy Editor, The Conversation. Hannah has covered the environment, science and medicine for more than 15 years. She has written for Nature, Science, Wired, bioGraphic, The Atlantic, the New York Times, the Globe and Mail and Maclean’s, among others. She launched and ran Arctic Deeply, an independent digital media project covering circumpolar Arctic issues. She has graduate degrees in biology (human genetics) from McGill University and in science and medical journalism from Boston University.

Jack Marley is Commissioning Editor, The Conversation. Jack joined The Conversation in 2018 after internships at Mongabay and The Press Association. He has a research background in marine biology and began his media career at university, where he reported on a fossil fuel divestment campaign for his campus paper. Jack covers science and environment and is interested in climate change, biodiversity and animal behaviour. He is based in Newcastle.

Hidden Monuments

Siobhan McDonald is an award-winning Irish artist interested in the changeable nature of landmass, historical events and their interconnection to time. Her latest exhibition, titled ‘Hidden Monuments’, presents a series of artistic enquiries to remind us of the Cairns, standing stones and Megalithic structures that foreshadow our architectural histories. 

BioBAT: Spontaneous Emergence of Order

BioBAT Art Space is the first exhibition space in New York City that is entirely dedicated to the intersection of Art and Science. Their inaugural art exhibit, ‘Spontaneous Emergence of Order’ features four interdisciplinary artists who create works based in science and technology.

Spontaneous emergence of order is a form of self-organization out of seeming chaos, the organic forming of systems mastered by no one person or thing, but the unfolding, natural order of a collective of events and actions. The four artists in this exhibit are sifting through this ordered chaos and creating their own new order based on their findings. Whether their interest is in the biological or the technological their artworks are all connected through the messiness of life itself and our connections to the natural world.

Being Plastic

Rebecca Gasior Altman is a writer and sociologist. Her work explores the social history of chemistry, plastics, pollution and environmental legacy— what we pass from one generation to the next. She holds a PhD in environmental sociology from Brown University, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Science and Environmental Health Network, a national think-tank.

The intersection of Art and the Environment

For over 40 years, Diane Burko has investigated monumental geological phenomena. Her practice at the intersection of art and science focuses on issues of climate change. Originally basing her imagery on research and visual data from scientists, she soon moved to bear witness directly in the Polar regions. In her painting projects such as ‘Politics of Snow’ and ‘Polar Investigations’ she explores visual strategies, translating data into imagery.

What I see around me

“When you are looking closely at the world it is impossible not to see damage and – if you have some understanding of what you are looking at – absence, so increasingly my work is motivated by the catastrophic impact of human actions on the natural world. I am inspired and appalled in equal measure by what I see around me.”

Emma Tuck’s work is informed by natural forms and patterns, refracted through the psychological, the political and the trivial.