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Exploring particular issue themes, articles will be created by contributors via invitation, commission and open submission from subscribers.

A house built on sand? A critical examination of the concept of ‘identity’ within contemporary ‘identity politics’, from a sociological perspective.

Adrian Holme is a teacher, writer and artist. He is an Associate Lecturer on the MA Art and Science, Central Saint Martins, and his cross-disciplinary background encompasses biology, fine art and information science. He is also a Lecturer on the BA Hons. Illustration course at Camberwell College of Arts, UAL, where he coordinates and delivers a humanities / critical theory element. His art practice extends across drawing, installation and performance, and he also works as a commercial copy writer and editor. In ‘A house built on sand?’ he draws upon sociological theory to critically examine the concept of identity represented in contemporary ‘identity politics’.

South Africa’s Blombos cave is home to the earliest drawing by a human

Christopher Henshilwood holds a 10 year South Africa National Research Foundation funded Research Chair and Professorship at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. He is also the Professor of African Prehistory in the Archaeology, History, Culture and Religion Institute at the University of Bergen, Norway.

Karen Loise van Niekerk is an archaeologist working on Middle Stone Age sites, specifically Blombos Cave and Klipdrift Shelter, in the southern Cape, South Africa.

Brave New World: the pill-popping, social media obsessed dystopia we live in

Dr Tony D. Sampson is reader in digital culture and communications in the School of Arts and Digital Industries (ADI), co-founder of Club Critical Theory and organiser of the Affect and Social Media conferences. His publications include ‘The Spam Book’ (Hampton Press, 2009) ‘Virality: Contagion Theory in the Age of Networks’ (Minnesota, 2012), ‘The Assemblage Brain: Sense Making in Neuroculture’ (Minnesota, 2016) and ‘Affect and Social Media’ (2018).

Why the search for a ‘Brave New World’ is to be found in your back yard

Jasmine Pradissitto is a physicist and a painter who sculpts and creates installations in plastics, light, metal, and geopolymers, embracing the dual worlds of the Scientist and Artist.
Described as ‘holograms you can touch’, her sculptures in new and discarded plastics, change in colour as the observer moves. Inspired by nature, the human condition, and scientific breakthroughs, forms are melted and reshaped from plastics using an innovative process she has developed, as a commentary on an unsustainable, increasingly Anthropocene world slowly being reshaped by the things we consume and then disregard.

Listening to nature: How sound can help us understand environmental change

Garth Paine is a composer, scholar and acoustic ecologist. He is an associate professor in interactive sound and digital media in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and associate professor of composition in the School of Music at Arizona State University. He crosses art-science boundaries with his community embedded work on environmental listening and creative place-making in addition to his environmental musical works and performances. In 2018 he was researcher/artist in residence in Europe at IRCAM (Centre Pompideau) and Center for Arts and Media (ZKM).

The intersection of Art and the Environment

For over 40 years, Diane Burko has investigated monumental geological phenomena. Her practice at the intersection of art and science focuses on issues of climate change. Originally basing her imagery on research and visual data from scientists, she soon moved to bear witness directly in the Polar regions. In her painting projects such as ‘Politics of Snow’ and ‘Polar Investigations’ she explores visual strategies, translating data into imagery.

Neural Connections

Tyler Sloan is a freelance data artist/scientist. While he is not developing custom Jupyter-based data processing pipelines, he produces computer-generated artwork and data-driven motion design using Open Data and formal scientific models. His artwork combines elements of his training as a developmental neurobiologist (B.Sc, Ph.D.) with his passion for Open Data.