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Exploring particular issue themes, articles will be created by contributors via invitation, commission and open submission from subscribers.

How the power of art can help scientists like me understand the experience of schizophrenia

Associate professor and Royal Society Research Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford.

“My research aims to understand how individual genes impact on the complex brain functions that are altered in psychiatric disorders. I believe that understanding these links will help to explain why some people respond well to treatments, whilst others do not, and will ultimately lead to new and improved therapies.”

Superposition

Steve Sangapore is a contemporary oil painter based in Boston, MA. Using vastly different stylistic approaches with various series’, his work can be described as an amalgamation of realism, surrealism and abstraction with thematic focuses on the human condition.

“Displaying a disciplined technique and great attention to detail, the style of my work blurs the lines between contemporary realism, surrealism and pure abstraction – often in a single painting. Through these modes of technical execution, a deep exploration into aspects of the human condition resonate throughout the work by mode of scientific archetypes and philosophical elements.”

Ketamine trips are uncannily like near-death experiences

Christian Jarrett is a senior editor at Aeon, working on the forthcoming Psyche website focused on psychological wellbeing. A cognitive neuroscientist by training, his writing has appeared in BBC Future, WIRED and New York Magazine, among others. His books include ‘The Rough Guide to Psychology’ (2011) and ‘Great Myths of the Brain’ (2014). His next, on personality change, will be published in 2021.

From Computational Creativity to Creative AI and Back Again

Simon Colton is a British computer scientist, currently working as Professor of Computational Creativity in the Game AI Research Group at Queen Mary University of London, UK and in the Sensilab at Monash University, Australia. He previously had an appointment at Falmouth University, UK and led the Computational Creativity Research Groups at Goldsmiths, University of London and at Imperial College, London in the positions of Professor and Reader, respectively. Simon is the driving force behind thepaintingfool.com, an artificial intelligence that he hopes will one day be accepted as an artist in its own right.

In Praise of Form: Towards a New Post-Humanist Art

Taney Roniger is a visual artist and writer based in New York. Her awards and honors in the visual arts include three Yaddo fellowships, a grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, and a traveling fellowship from the Stacey Sussman Cavrell Memorial Foundation. Since 2012 she has been a contributing writer for The Brooklyn Rail, for which she served as Guest Editor in December 2017.

The Maths of Life and Death

Dr Kit Yates is a Senior Lecturer in mathematical biology at the University of Bath. His job consists of taking real-world phenomena and uncovering the mathematical truths that lie behind them. He extracts the common patterns that underlie these processes and communicates them. He works in applications as diverse as embryonic disease, the patterns on eggshells and the devastating swarming of locust plagues – teasing out the mathematical connections in the process.

Meet AICAN, a machine that operates as an autonomous artist

Ahmed Elgammal is Professor at the Department of Computer Science, Rutgers University. Director of the Art & AI Lab. Executive Council Faculty at the Center for Cognitive Science at Rutgers University. His research focusses on Computer Vision, Visual Learning, Data Science in Digital Humanities, and Human motion analysis. His research on Art & AI received wide international media attention, including many reports on the Washington Post, New York Times, NBC News, the Times, the Daily Telegraph, Science News, and many others.

If machines want to make art, will humans understand it?

Rui Penha is assistant professor of composition at the Superior School of Music and Performing Arts in Porto. He is a composer and media artist, and his work has appeared in the National Contemporary Art Museum in Lisbon, among many others.

Miguel Carvalhais is an assistant professor at the University of Porto in Portugal. His latest book is ‘Artificial Aesthetics: Creative Practices in Computational Art and Design’ (2016).