Archive of Author | Kit Yates

Kit Yates is a Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Bath, where his research focuses on the mathematical modelling and analysis of biological systems. Throughout his career to date, he has worked on a variety of intriguing problems, modelling the random motion of single molecules at one extreme, to the large-scale migration of swarming insects at the other. He currently works on problems of cell migration, collective animal motion, Nematode dynamics and egg pigment patterning.

Kit is a passionate communicator of Mathematics. He and his work have featured on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Reuters, RTE, and the BBC world service (amongst others). His 2016 work on animal pigmentation patterns was published in Nature Communications. A wide range of media outlets ran with the story including the Guardian, the Telegraph, the Daily Mail, and The Mirror.

He recently won the Bath University Vice-chancellor’s award for public engagement with research. To this end Kit writes regularly for The Conversation. His articles have received hundreds of thousands of reads and he has also written for the Times, the Guardian and the Independent on topics as diverse as, “The mathematics of the Paralympics,” to, “Why our perception of time changes as we age“. In the past, Kit also set the questions for the Maths/comedy fusion TV program Dara O’Brian’s School of Hard Sums.

http://kityates.com/

http://www.bath.ac.uk/math-sci/contacts/academics/kit-yates/

Articles with Kit Yates


How many locusts does it take to start a biblical plague? Just three

Kit Yates is a Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Bath, UK, where his research focuses on the mathematical modelling and analysis of biological systems. Throughout his career to date, he has worked on a variety of intriguing problems, modelling the random motion of single molecules at one extreme, to the large-scale migration of swarming insects at the other.

The Mathematics of Life

Kit Yates is a Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Bath, UK, where his research focuses on the mathematical modelling and analysis of biological systems. Throughout his career to date, he has worked on a variety of intriguing problems, modelling the random motion of single molecules at one extreme, to the large-scale migration of swarming insects at the other. In this exclusive interview he discusses his research and work in Mathematical Biology.