Archive of Author | Elizabeth Jameson

Elizabeth Jameson‘s artwork lives at the intersection of science, art and technology. Inspired by the brain’s ability to change and adapt, Jameson’s work expands the conventional definition of portraiture by using her own brain scans as way of confronting what it means to be human. Her professional and personal life changed profoundly in 1991 when she was diagnosed with secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis. Undergoing numerous brain scans to track the progression of her disease, she initiated a deep fascination with the architecture of the brain and began focusing her art practice on reinterpreting these frightening yet, mesmerizing images. Jameson’s images serve as a starting point to describe the ever-changing experience of living with an imperfect brain.

Jameson’s work is in permanent collections of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and major universities both nationally and internationally. Her work has also been featured as cover art in numerous scientific publications such as Neurology, Scientific American, The Translational Scientist, The Journal of The American Academy of Neurology and Oxford University Press.

Currently, Jameson is collaborating with healthcare professionals and patients on artwork that would build community among those who treat and suffer from illness. She is dedicated to creating art installations that build on the narrative of illness from the patient’s perspective.

www.jamesonfineart.com

Articles with Elizabeth Jameson


Communicating the complexities of chronic illness through art.

Elizabeth Jameson’s artwork lives at the intersection of science, art and technology. Inspired by the brain’s ability to change and adapt, Jameson’s work expands the conventional definition of portraiture by using her own brain scans as way of confronting what it means to be human. Diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1991, she became obsessed with the inside of her mind. With no background in art, she began using her brain scans to celebrate her mind, reinterpreting the images that represented her ever-changing understanding of living with a progressive disease. In the process, she became an artist.