Tag Archives: Space

What is nothing? Martin Rees Q&A

Lord Martin Rees is Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge. He holds the honorary title of Astronomer Royal. Lord Rees is co-founder of the Centre for the Study of the Existential Risk, an early stage initiative which brings together a scientist, philosopher and software entrepreneur.

Topology and the Visualization of Space

Artist and author, Tony Robbin, works with painting, sculpture and computer visualizations. He is a pioneer in the computer visualization of four-dimensional geometry. With his paintings and innovative computer visualizations of hyperspace, he continues to investigate different models of the fourth dimension and how these are applied in art and physics.

Cosmic alchemy: Colliding neutron stars show us how the universe creates gold

Duncan Brown is the Charles Brightman Professor of Physics at Syracuse University. He works on gravitational-wave astronomy and astrophysics.

Edo Berger is Professor of Astronomy at Harvard University. He researches a wide range of explosive and eruptive astrophysical phenomena, including gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events, super-luminous supernovae, and other optical transients (from the Pan-STARRS project and elsewhere), as well as magnetic activity in sub-stellar objects.

Laura Krasnow: the_space_between_the_stars

Laura Krasnow uses the medium of photography to explore the connections between the artistic and scientific realms of inquiry.

Working with traditional and non-traditional art making tools, including printmaking, digital photography, film and Polaroid film, drawing and paint, she seeks to interpret theories of physics, math and neurological research, to reconstruct individual recollections of time, place, and space.

Missing Mass

Experimenting with ideas of time, space and physicality, Carey Young’s body of artistic work explores law as a separate kind of ‘reality’, one with its own inherent subjectivities and points of breakdown.

‘Missing Mass’ (2010) is a sculptural work created with the scientific guidance of Prof. Malcolm Fairbairn, an astrophysicist based at King’s College London and is exhibited at the Science Gallery, London exhibition ‘Dark Matter: 95% of the Universe is missing’.

Voices

Aura Satz is Moving Image Tutor and Reader in Fine Art (Sound and Moving Image) on the Contemporary Art Practice programme at the Royal College of Art.

Aura Satz’s work encompasses film, sound, performance and sculpture. Her work centres on the trope of ventriloquism in order to conceptualise a distributed, expanded and shared notion of voice. Works are made in conversation and use dialogue as both method and subject matter.
Satz has made a body of work centred on various sound technologies in order to explore notation systems, code and encryption, and ways in which these might resist standardisation, generating new soundscapes, and in turn new forms of listening and attending to the other.

There’s more to this than meets the eye

The work of Yu-Chen Wang asks fundamental questions about human identity at a key point in history, where eco-systems and techno-systems have become inextricably intertwined. Yu-Chen’s central practice is drawing, allowing her to explore and meditate on mechanical and biological forms, and the ways in which their bodily borderlines blur and mutate. From these extemporisations, she then finds collaborative routes that take her work into the realms of fictional text, provoking the subsequent production of sculptural installation, performance, music, and film, in various combinations.

Her new large-scale intricate drawing, exhibited at the Science Gallery, London exhibition ‘Dark Matter: 95% of the Universe is missing’, explores the concepts of dark matter and how knowledge is created.

95% of the Universe is missing

Professor Malcolm Fairbairn is a member of the Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Research Group, Kings College London. His research lies at the boundary between cosmology, particle physics and astrophysics. In particular, he is interested in dark matter, dark energy, cosmological inflation and particle astrophysics. He has been awarded an ERC consolidator grant running from 2015-2020 to study dark matter and particle physics in the early Universe.