Tag Archives: Computing

On Computational Art

Ernest Edmonds’ art is in the constructivist tradition and he is a pioneer in the use of computers and computational ideas. His art explores algorithms used to relation to colour, time, communication and interaction. He first used computers in his practice in 1968, first showed an interactive artwork with Stroud Cornock in 1970 and first showed a generative time-based computer work in London in 1985. His many awards include ACM SIGGRAPH 2017; Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement In Digital Art and ACM SIGCHI 2017; Lifetime Achievement Award for the Practice of Computer Human Interaction.

Ai-Da: Robot Artist

“Ai-Da is the world’s first ultra-realistic AI robot artist. She can draw, and is a performance artist. As a machine, with AI capabilities, her artist persona is the artwork, along with her drawings, performance art and collaborative paintings and sculptures.”

Named in honour of the pioneering female mathematician Ada Lovelace, Ai-Da was invented by gallery director Aidan Meller. She had her first solo exhibition, ‘Unsecured Futures’, at St John’s College, Oxford in June 2019.

Harnessing Slime Mould Communication for Musical Computing

Eduardo R. Miranda is a composer working at the crossroads of music and science. He is most notable in the United Kingdom for his scientific research into computer music, particularly in the field of human-machine interfaces where brain waves will replace keyboards and voice commands to permit the disabled to express themselves musically. He has composed music for symphonic orchestras, chamber groups, solo instruments – with and without live electronics – and electroacoustic music – and also for theatre and contemporary dance.

Music Notes

While attending grad school at NYU, I also took piano classes. I loved learning Baroque pieces from JS Bach, Henry Purcell, and Domenico Scarlatti. When the pieces were originally composed, the piano didn’t exist yet, and they were primarily written for a harpsichord which doesn’t allow for much tonality There is something very fascinating to […]

becoming.a(thing)

Špela Petrič and Miha Turšič have been working together for several years and have a background in natural sciences, new media, bio art, product design, space culturalisation and postgravity art. We merged our efforts in the development of new artistic methodologies as a response to new conditions, knowledge and technology; to research the subjective, context dependent value of scientific knowledge; the development of artistic entities; to study the human condition in relation to the non-human; and to research art and humanities in outer space.

In this exclusive interview they discuss their work and their current FEAT ‘becoming.a(thing)’ collaborative project .