Tag Archives: Artificial Intelligence

Dreamscapes

“The underlying focus of my work is to reverse engineer the psychology behind the human experience of special places. What I mean by ‘special places’ are precise locations in our world where something very powerful happens; namely, a reaction that goes beyond the visual to also encompass a visceral and cognitive response.”

Daniel Ambrosi has been exploring groundbreaking methods of visual presentation since graduating from Cornell University with degrees in architecture and 3D graphics. In 2011, he devised a unique form of computational photography that generates extremely high-resolution immersive vibrant images, His latest work, ‘Dreamscapes’, builds upon his previous experiments by adding a powerful new graphics tool, a modified version of ‘DeepDream’, a computer vision program evolved from Google engineers’ desire to visualize the inner workings of Deep Learning artificial intelligence models.

Victoria Westerman and Natasha Gertler: Visualogical

Visualogical is both an interactive digital art workshop and a novel system of social investigation, developed by artist Victoria Westerman and curator Natasha Gertler.

By harnessing the power of group collaboration and artificial intelligence, Visualogical hacks into the visual subconscious of participants and allows them to illustrate it with regards to a chosen theme.

Deep Learning

Yoshua Bengio is a Canadian computer scientist, most noted for his work on artificial neural networks and deep learning. He is Full Professor of the Department of Computer Science and Operations Research, head of the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA),CIFAR Program co-director of the CIFAR program on Learning in Machines and Brains, Canada Research Chair in Statistical Learning Algorithms. His main research ambition is to understand principles of learning that yield intelligence. In this exclusive interview he discusses his ideas and work on AI and Deep Learning.

Cyborgs and I

Professor Kevin Warwick’s main research areas are artificial intelligence, biomedical systems, robotics and cyborgs. Due to his research as a self-experimenter he is frequently referred to as the world’s first Cyborg. His experiments into implant technology led to him being featured as the cover story on the US magazine, ‘Wired’. He achieved the world’s first direct electronic communication between two human nervous systems, the basis for thought communication. Another project extended human sensory input to include ultrasonics. He also linked his nervous system with the internet in order to control a robot hand directly from his neural signals, across the Atlantic Ocean. In this exclusive interview he discusses his ideas and work on AI, robotics and the future of humans ‘plugging’ into technology.

‘Machine folk’ music composed by AI shows technology’s creative side

Bob Sturm is a Lecturer in Digital Media at the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, specialising in audio and music signal processing, machine listening, and evaluation. Oded Ben-Tal is a composer with complementary research interests at the intersection of Music, Cognition, and Computing. His compositions range from instrumental works to interactive pieces combining live performers with electronics, and include multimedia collaborations with artist from other domains such as video, dance, and visual design.

AI and Neurography

Mario Klingemann is an artist working with algorithms, data and artificial neural networks. He investigates the possibilities that machine learning and artificial intelligence offer in understanding how creativity, culture and their perception work. He has worked part-time as an artist in residence at Google Arts and Culture since early 2016 and is a prominent member of a new school of artists who are turning neural network technology inside out. In this exclusive interview he discusses his ideas and work.

AI and Consciousness

Keith Frankish is a philosopher and writer. He is an Honorary Reader in Philosophy at the University of Sheffield, a Visiting Research Fellow (formerly Senior Lecturer) at The Open University, and an Adjunct Professor with the Brain and Mind Program in Neurosciences at the University of Crete. His interests lie mainly in philosophy of mind, and he is well known for defending an illusionist view of phenomenal consciousness and a two-level theory of the human mind. In this exclusive interview he discusses his ideas on the relationship between Artificial Intelligence and Consciousness.

Portraits of Imaginary People

Mike Tyka studied Biochemistry and Biotechnology at the University of Bristol. He obtained his PhD in Biophysics in 2007 and went on to work as a research fellow at the University of Washington and has been studying the structure and dynamics of protein molecules. Since 2015 he has also begun working with artificial neural networks as an artistic medium and tool. His latest generative portraits series “Portraits of Imaginary People” has been shown at ARS Electronica in Linz, OutOfSight 2017 and at the New Musueum in Karuizawa, Japan. Mike currently works on machine learning at Google in Seattle.