Archive of Author | Luke Jerram

Luke Jerram’s multidisciplinary practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations and live arts projects. Living in the UK but working internationally for 18 years, Jerram has created a number of extraordinary art projects which have excited and inspired people around the globe.

Jerram has a set of different narratives that make up his practice which are developing in parallel with one another. He is known worldwide for his large scale public artworks. Since 2008 his celebrated street pianos installation ‘Play Me, I’m Yours’ has been presented in over 50 cities and been enjoyed by more than 10 million people around the world. Launched by the French Minister of Culture in Paris and Mayor Bloomberg in NYC, the installation has received press coverage in almost every newspaper and television station around the globe. Most recently his giant installation Park and Slide caught the public’s imagination, creating 500 news stories reaching an estimated 1 billion people worldwide.

Jerram’s Glass Microbiology artworks are in museum collections around the world including The Metropolitan Museum of Art (NYC), Shanghai Museum of Glass, Wellcome Collection (London) and Corning Museum of Glass (USA). In 2010 Jerram won the coveted Rakow Award for this work and a fellowship at the Museum of Glass, Washington.  In 2015 his sculptures were presented alongside the work of Leonardo da Vinci at the Artscience Museum, Singapore. Jerram’s sculptures are also respected in the scientific community with features in The LancetScientific American, The BMJ and on the front cover of Nature Magazine.

Jerram builds and manages specialist teams of engineers, craftsmen and technicians to help him realise his works. From composers to glassblowers, medieval musicologists to hot air balloonists. In this way, he says “I’m only limited by my imagination in what can be produced. Anything is possible.”

http://www.lukejerram.com/

Articles with Luke Jerram


Glass Microbiology

Luke Jerram’s multidisciplinary practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations and live arts projects. Since 2004, he has been turning viruses and other pathogens into stunning glass sculptures, in an ongoing series titled “Glass Microbiology.” Covering maladies such as AIDS, Ebola and Swine Flu, his works are both beautiful and disturbing, challenging observers to reinterpret their view of the tiny organisms.